Surfer ‘not pretty enough to sponsor’


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35663889/embed

Despite being the best female surfer in Brazil, Silvana Lima was refused sponsorship deals because she wasn’t considered sufficiently good-looking.

Interesting video – and the one quote in heading … ‘… if i was a man this wouldn’t happen’ scarily true perhaps.

Keep your head (warm)


reblog from BearBones and a link to purchase:

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Depending which old wife you care to believe, you loose between 50% and 90% of your body heat through your head … no you don’t. Body heat is lost largely through radiation, so its loss is proportionate to area, can you imagine how big your head would need to be to radiate 90% of your lost body heat?

Although you don’t lose quite as much precious heat through your noggin as some people imagine, you certainly loose some and just like any other part of your body, it requires insulating. Wearing a hat (or maybe pulling your hood up) is the usual course of action and when Jack Frost’s sharpened his teeth, what better hat than one containing the best insulator known to man , the undisputed king of warm – down. I’m very fortunate to own two hats insulated with down. The first is handmade, filled with the finest down any amount of money can buy. The outer material is ultralight, the stitching show quality, it weighs virtually nothing and cost considerably more …. and I’ll admit, at times I’m scared to use it. My other down hat is this one. The down may not be of the same quality, it’s produced in a factory rather than a craftsman’s workshop, it weighs a little bit more but it cost an awful lot less, so I’m far less concerned about sticking it on my head while I roll about on a damp forest floor.

You just know she’s saying, “take the hat off, take it off now”.
In my opinion, the Montane Plume makes a fantastic adornment to the head of the potentially cold bikepacker. It contains 18g of 650fp HyperDRY down, that might not sound like much but trust me, it’s more than enough for a hat. Unlike the majority of insulating head wear, the Plume is a cap rather than the more common beanie style. While in the minds of some, a cap might not score quite so highly in the style stakes, I’ve found it to be much more practical. Firstly, the cap extends lower at the back and sides which results in more warmth and cosy ears. The stiff peak is a bonus and ideal for helping keep any midge netting off your face. Another nice touch which adds to the practicality especially when sleeping, is the removable elasticated strap … it’s a simple thing but obviously makes a massive difference to keeping the thing secure and in place while you’re tucked up in your sleeping bag. The outer material is something called FREEFLOW – although confusingly, mine says Pertex Quantum on the outside. Either way, it’s lightweight and water resistant. The combination of water resistant down and outer, means a bit of light drizzle or condensation won’t turn your fluffy, puffy had into a clumpy mess.
The claimed weight is 49g, the Bear Bones scales say 48g without the stuff sack but with the strap. That’s pretty impressive given the amount of warmth it provides. If you don’t want to use the supplied stuff sack, then the Plume will compress down to around the size of a satsuma, so finding it a happy home alongside your sleeping bag or whatever shouldn’t cause any issues.
The Montane Plume – warm as toast, cheap as chips. Available in black, blue or red for £25 or a few pounds less with a little careful shopping.

Happy New Year


We wish you the readers:

– a huge happiness 
– an iron health for you and your loved ones
– a ton and a half of love
– creative boldness and respectful impertinence
– the laughter of children
– limitless dreams
– a good pinch of humor
– …and some temporal accessories to live your own time!

Power Surf – not strictly surfing but good news to spread


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Tidal power, which could make a considerably energy contribution, has long been the goal of scientists the world over. But while many have dreamed, few have delivered in harnessing the ocean’s strength. As a result tidal energy has lagged far behind solar and wind powers with typical barriers cited as cost, hostile saltwater environment and damage to existing marine life.

That could all be set to change thanks to a British start up, Kepler Energy, who have developed a brand new form of water generator harking back to a traditional water mill. It is predicted the cost of operating, building and delivering energy could be cheaper than that of wind farms and other renewable energy at present.

Costs will be cheaper than lagoons and in time we will be cheaper than offshore wind generation

“Costs will be cheaper than lagoons and in time we will be cheaper than offshore wind generation. Furthermore, investment risk is manageable since turbines are added incrementally to form the fence, with each one generating revenue as it is added.” said Peter Dixon, Chairman of Kepler Energy.

The Kepler patented ‘Transverse Horizontal Axis Water Turbine (THAWT)’ is able to operate in lower velocity and shallower waters than traditional axial turbines and the company are planning the process to ensure that it bears no significant risk to marine life and other users of the sea.

Each turbine is modular and can start producing electricity as soon as it is in position. As more sections are added the power return increases exponentially with a 10km run being likened to a small nuclear reactor.

Kepler are planning a trial 30MW tidal energy fence that will be located in the Bristol Channel, most likely to be located in the Aberthaw to Minehead stretch of water. They are hoping this will be operational by 2020/21.

To find out more visit www.keplerenergy.co.uk

google doodle – it’s a Duke


Screenshot 2015-08-24 22.22.20

It was in the turbulent Pacific waters off Corona del Mar 90 years ago when Duke Kahanamoku, the celebrated Hawaiian surfing and Olympic swimming titleholder, proved once again to be a genuine American champion. He is the subject of a Google Doodle today.

Dawn was breaking that Sunday, June 14, 1925, when Kahanamoku, then 34, in the company of several surfers, including Gerard “Jerry” Vultee, his best friend and pioneer aircraft designer, was preparing to enter the waves on his 12-foot mahogany surfboard.

The “Duke” (who was born 125 years ago today) could see that trouble was brewing when massive waves and swells propelled by fierce winds began to lash the coast.

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All of a sudden, one of his companions cried out, “That boat is in trouble,” pointing to the 40-foot, 5-ton yacht Thelma attempting to enter Newport Harbor through the churning breakers.

Coastal storms had come up suddenly during previous months, and just recently they had brought havoc and death to the very waters Kahanamoku and his friends were planning to surf.

A year earlier, on June 8, 1924, the 30-foot fishing boat Adieu, carrying 16 passengers and its captain, overturned during a storm off Corona del Mar, drowning five fishermen from Santa Ana. On May 21, 1925 — just three weeks before the Thelma’s foundering — a rowboat carrying three teenagers capsized in heavy waves. Two of the youths made it to shore; a third drowned.

So the fears of Kahanamoku mounted as he observed the hapless Thelma struggle to stay afloat.

“Only a porpoise or a sea lion had the right to be out there …,” he later recalled, according to old news stories. “From the shore we saw the Thelma wallowing in the water just seaward of where the breakers were falling. You could see her rails crowded with fishermen. She appeared to be trying to fight her way toward safe water … but it obviously was a losing battle.

“A mountain of solid green water curled down upon the vessel … spume geysered up in all directions … then before the next mammoth breaker could blot out the view again, it was obvious the Thelma had capsized and thrown her passengers into the boiling sea.”

The following day, in a dramatic Page One story headlined, “Five Are Drowned When Waves Capsize Yacht … Twelve More Narrowly Escape As Swimmers Bring Victims to Shore on Surf Boards,” the Los Angeles Times described the frightening scene.

“The swell, as it gained momentum, merged into a mountainous wave and crashed over the bow, smashing the plate glass window of the engine-room, flooding the compartment and stopping the engine,” according to the article. “Practically all the members of the pleasure party were swept overboard with the first wave and were struggling in the midst of the torn wreckage and pounding waves.

“Before the fishermen could put on life preservers and assistance could reach them, the boat was caught broadside in the teeth of the tremendous breakers and rolled completely over twice.”

The sinking, said the newspaper, “resulted in the drowning of five passengers. Twelve others were pulled from the sea in a spectacular rescue staged by Duke Kahanamoku, famous Hawaiian swimmer, and others who braved the heavy seas on surfboards.”

A watch if you spend all the time outdoors (and don’t want to scratch your rolex/omega/TAG)


I must admit although i like nice watches BUT (and its a big But) when i head out into the wild (or working in places like Iraq or Rwanda) I generally take along a G-Shock watch. This one does a lot in a simple package.

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Casio announced a brand new high-end G-Shock model at Baselworld 2015, the GWG-1000 Mudmaster. This new model combines features of the Mudman and Rangeman with an analog/digital hybrid display. It has a case design that looks like a cross between an aviation G-Shock and the Rangeman, giving it a tough and tactical appearance. Model numbers are GWG-1000-1A (black), GWG-1000-1A3 (black with olive band), and GWG-1000-1A9 (black with yellow band).