5 great scottish bike routes


courtesy of Evans

Scotland is famed for its fantastic scenery, islands, hills, mountains and get-away-from it all feel. There are also plenty of roads that offer great routes for quiet cycling. Why not pick one of our favourite cycle routes in Scotland and head off for a day or two of fabulous touring?

Lochs & Glens North

Start: SECC, Glasgow
Finish: Ness Bridge, Inverness
Distance: 214 miles

This route follows the NCN (National Cycle Network) Route 7. It is a mix of roads and traffic-free paths. The ride takes you through both of Scotland’s acclaimed national parks, Loch Lomond and the Trossachs and the Cairngorms, with a huge variety of beautiful countryside and wildlife.

You’ll also pass six lochs, multiple castles and cycle over the famous Glen Ogle viaduct. The route has its fair share of long climbs but equally, there are some great descents.

With more than 200 miles to cover you can split the journey into day-long sections or decide just to ride some of the routes in a day and return to the start by public transport. Be sure to book ahead if you want to reserve a bike space on a train. SeeSustrans

 

Lochs Glens Sunfall Lock Lomond

 

Five Ferries Bike Ride

Start/Finish: CalMac ferry terminal at Ardrossan, Ayrshire.
Distance: 71 miles

A legendary bike ride is this island-hopping route on Scotland’s west coast.

The route, as the name suggests, includes five short ferry crossings and 4 cycle sections across the mainland of Scotland.

Many people ride the route in one day, which is possible if you time the ferries and your cycling carefully. Alternatively, you can take your time and overnight on the islands.

A CalMac ferry takes you from the mainland at Ardrossan to Brodick on the Isle of Arran, where you cycle 15 miles to Lochranza. The next ferry heads to Claonaig on the Kintyre Peninsula.

From Claonaig to Tarbet is 10.5 miles before a ferry to Portavadie on the Cowal Peninsula. The ride to Colintraive is 19 miles and includes a long hill climb with fabulous views over the Kyles of Bute.

Another ferry journeys to Rhubodach on the Isle of Bute and then you ride 8 miles to Rothesay. The last ferry of this trip heads to Wemyss Bay and then a bike ride of 18.5 miles back to Ardrossan. Alternatively, you could take the train from Wemyss to Ardrossan.

More details of the route at Five Ferries Cycle

Five Ferries Cycle Arran

 

Scottish Coast to Coast

Start: Annan, Dumfries & Galloway
Finish: The Forth Bridge, near Edinburgh
Distance: 125 miles

The Scottish C2C was created by the same founders as the popular English C2C this is a new waymarked long-distance route for Scotland.

It takes cyclists through the beautiful rolling countryside of southern Scotland, starting in the small town of Annan on the coast in Dumfries and Galloway and heading north through three valleys, the Annan, Tweed and Esk.

The route then reaches the Scottish capital city of Edinburgh and on to the Forth Bridge, which is one of the great wonders of the engineering world.

You could easily start the route in Edinburgh and head south to the coast of Dumfries and Galloway. See the route guide book, The Ultimate Scottish C2C Guide, priced £11.50 from Bike Ride Maps.

 

Ring of Breadalbane Road Cycle

Start/Finish: Crieff, Perth & Kinross
Distance: 100 miles (160km)

The Breadalbane “High Ground” area of Perthshire boasts breath-taking scenery and lots of lovely quiet roads. The full 100-mile route is a big undertaking in a single day although some riders will be up for the challenge.
For easier days in the saddle, split the route into a few sections over two of three days.

In the summer, an Explorer Bus allows cyclists to access different start and finish points, such as Crieff, Comrie, Killin and Aberfeldy.

See Breadalbane Road Cycling

Breadalbane Cycle Route

 

North Coast 500

Start/Finish: Inverness
Distance: 516 miles

Scotland’s answer to America’s Route 66, the NC500 travels just over 500 miles in the stunning north-west of Scotland. First created for drivers, the route has become a popular goal for cyclists.
Most cyclists take a week to ride it, although others will be keen to cover it in less time.

The circular route can be completed clockwise or anti-clockwise and meanders through the counties of Caithness, Sutherland and Ross-shire. Be prepared for long hill climbs and fabulous landscapes.

See NC500

NC500 Route View

Dream Bike: Ti Carbon Bastion Beastie


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The technology is there and a few builders are utilizing it for sure, but you don’t often see a 3D printed frame with elegance like Bastion Cycles‘ titanium and carbon road bike.

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This thing is a beauty and for me, was a pleasure to photograph. I love the contrast of materials, the 3d-printed NAHBS insignia on the driveside dropout and the mean fuckin’ stance of this road bike.

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VÉLOSOPHY: Swedish Bike Brand that gives back


Clean minimal bikes in an array of bright colors, where each purchase means a new bike for a young school girl in Ghana? Sign us up.

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This is the mission behind Vélosophy bikes, the latest brand to hit the bicycle market. For them, the bikes are striking yet simple, stylish and functional. With clean, aluminum frames accented by bold colors, the bikes are meant to lift your spirits, much like a bouquet of tulips.

Basket

With a modern frame, the Vélosophy bikes still have a touch of days gone by, with their updated take on a luggage carrier. The bike comes in two different editions — the Comfort Edition and the Sport Edition. As its name suggests, the Comfort Edition is a little more comfortable, with a wider saddle and more upright seat. The Sport Edition has a forward leaning seat, light chain guard, and narrower saddle.

comfort-green

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comfort-lila

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Lastly, they are the only bicycle brand to have a One for One promise in collaboration with UNICEF. With every bike that is purchased, Vélosophy will create and donate a bike to Ghanaian school girls.

Fred Whitton Training Ride


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Now the Fred Whitton Challenge is CRAZY ….

110 miles with over 3200m of climbing …. The Fred Whitton Challenge is a gruelling 112 mile sportive challenge ride for charity around the Lake District, run in memory of Fred Whitton. From 2014 it starts & finishes in Grasmere, and the route includes the climbs of Kirkstone, Honister, Newlands, Whinlatter, Hardknott & Wrynose passes. MORE HERE

So someone from the meetup group is doing the ride and wanted to do a ride where she could practise some hills ….. so Sunday morning is cold and sunny and COLD …. did I mention cold.

We head off and temp on the Garmin already says -3.4C ouch – my face is feeling battered from the cold. The plan is to do the tak-ma-doon and Crow road loop

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but as we get to the Tak we encounter the climb and a lot of Black Ice on the road. Downhill could be deadly … so we climb to the top grab a breather then decide to descend to the golf course where the black ice patches thin out … and ascend again. At the top of the tak we could look down for miles at the clearing mist and freezing fog.

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then on for a slow descent to the north side a river ford where one person took a tumble on ice at the edge, stood up and fell over again …

Down the long bumpy carron valley road to the Crow – again a puncture halted proceedings ….

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i got to admire the road (still bumpy)

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and also find the puncture that Andy couldn’t and look at my nice clean tights … IMG_8872.JPG

Bike filthy man filthy ….

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then the weather is so cold that the Edge 510 dies closer to home …. legs tired ….good spring ride.

 

Friday Bike Poster: Pirelli Tyres


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Pirelli

The history of Pirelli coincides with the history of the tyre industry. Founded in Milan in 1872, Pirelli & C – the original name of the company founded by Giovanni Battista Pirelli, a 24-year-old engineer – was initially a factory producing rubber articles. But the process of product diversification began immediately, introducing those elements of innovation and quality that still characterise the company today.

So Pirelli started to produce insulated wire for telegraphy, submarine telegraph cables and, eventually, the first bicycle tyre. The first car tyre, the “Ercole” was made in 1901.

Genesis Longitude 2016 is a 27.5plus model


Could be best choice for bikepacking ….

Longitude was the surprise trump card in the pack for last years’ range. As a brand new model (alongside the Tour de Fer) we were cautious of how well they’d be received and undercooked the numbers, selling out too early in the season. Apologies for those we disappointed. What it did show was that there was a healthy number of you out there looking for that versatile bike to take you places –an ethos we’ve tried not to stray too far from with the new 2016 model. Let’s take a look at the who, how, what and why with the new, 2016 model…

The 2016 complete bike will retail for £1199.99srp

Whilst the frameset option in ‘Pepper Yellow’ will retail for £499.99srp

Changes have been occurring at a rate of knots in the mtb sector. When we first drew up the Longitude nearly two years ago now we designed it as a standard 29er (albeit with 2.4” tyres on 35mm rims) with a long wheelbase and big clearances. The tweaks to make it 29+ compatible happened right at the eleventh hour, just before we pushed the button on production – we had pretty much the prerequisite clearances already and it didn’t need much modification to make it 29+ ready (slightly longer chainstays, etc). We figured there’d be nothing to lose in adding a further string to its already quite versatile bow. Now, you have to remember this was at a time when the concept of 29+ still had that new car smell and tyre options were few and far between (Vee Tire Co’s Traxx Fatty and Surly’s Knard were pretty much the only early options) and 27.5+ was only be talked about in hushed whispers at trade shows, by a few progressive/bonkers (delete as applicable) folk. Fast forward 6 months and with 27.5+ now having firmly arrived on the scene we had some difficult decisions to make with the Longitude…

27.5+ vs. 29+. There’s only one way to settle this…

…analysis and debate. A standard 29×2.3” on an average rim measures up about approx. 740mm in OD. A 29+ on accompanying 40+mm rim measures up about 780mm – a difference of well over an inch. This difference in tyre OD has a dramatic effect on trail (more on trail here – http://www.pinkbike.com/news/To-The-Point-Rake-and-Trail.html). As a manufacturer we’re then left in limbo as to whether we choose a headtube angle and fork offset to cater for the standard 29” wheel/tyre combo (at the detriment to 29+ handling), go in favour of the 29+ setup (vice versa – at the detriment of std 29” handling, or pick a middle ground that may compromise both that could potentially leave us with a bad handling bike with either setup. The original Longitude was designed around the as-specced 29×2.4” Conti X-Kings on the 35mm Alex Supra35 rims. With Vee Tire Co.’s Traxx Fatty’s fitted we felt the bike lost a lot of its agility; fine in a straight line, especially when pointed downhill but a little lethargic, slow to accelerate and cumbersome in responding to steering inputs. Enter stage left 27.5+… With an OD much, much closer to that of a standard 29×2.3” you can truly have a bike with a geometry that handles well with both setups, without any compromises (i.e. much more compatible). Not only that, you get the same air volume as the 29+ setup but in a lighter (both rim, tyre and tube), faster accelerating, more manoeuvrable package that that a wider range of folk, especially at the smaller end of the size spectrum, can comfortably fit on without A) needing a step ladder to get on and B) still have a decent amount of standover clearance. The case for 29+ was not looking all that strong, effectively trumped by the new kid on the block. For those wanting to delve deeper on the debate and differences between the two plus wheel sizes, check out the links below…

http://www.bikemag.com/gear/mean-27-plus-29-plus-bikes/

http://forums.mtbr.com/27-5-29/27-5-vs-29-a-960829.html

Hubs, Axles & Boost

So, we’ve decided to go for 27.5+ for all of the above reasons. The simple option would be to add Boost 110/148 thru-axles at either end, right? Well, yes and no. Whilst it would give us the required wider chainline and accompanying chain/tyre clearance, pretty much the only hub options (I’ve seen) are thru-axle (at the moment). Whilst this isn’t such an issue on the front, out back we’ve got our nicecly versatile ‘do-it-all’ horizontal dropout with mech hanger (also with added Rohloff OEM2 plate mounting point for MY16), going to Boost148 at the back would’ve meant the end of that, save going to a complicated and not mention expensive sliding dropout system (or EBB). Not something we really wanted to do. So, we decided to stick with the 135mm QR rear primarily for ultimate drivetrain versatility (conventional geared, singlespeed, Alfine and now Rohloff also) but, as ever things weren’t quite that simple…

We already had weight saving cut-outs on the original waterjet cut dropouts so it wasn’t too much work to re-configure them and add-in the required slot on the non-driveside dropout to shadow the path of the axle on the horiztonal dropout. The 6mm thick plate should be plenty to resist the torque of the Rofloff hub. 

Instead of mounting to the rear/lower disc brake tab the, OEM2 axle plate is turned anti-clockwise approx. 90 degrees and the bolt mounts through the tab, sliding with the wheel axle on the horizontal dropout 

Clearance Balancing Act

So, sticking with 135mm QR for universal drivetrain options alongside the 27.5+ wheel/tyre combo, the next tricky point was gearing. With us pitching the Longitude as our backpacking/offroad tourer I really wanted to keep the nice wide-range the 40-30-22T triple provided. Alas, a 50mm chainline triple doesn’t play nicely with a full-blown 27.5×3.0” setup, least of all on a 135mm rear spacing. The solution was to opt for WTB’s excellent and slightly smaller Trailblazer 27.5×2.8” mounted onto Jalco’s DD38 rims (38mm ext./33mm int.). The resultant tyre outer diameter measures up about 10mm shorter than a std 29×2.3”, so whilst a little smaller, still a much better match than 29” vs 29+, but crucially measures up at about XX” width, giving just enough chain clearance when in the granny at the front and largest sprocket at the back. And, yes, we realise that one the one hand we’ve wholeheartedly adopted new standards and, on the other, gone well out of our way to avoid them! For those wanting to go the full monty with a custom-build frameset option and 27.5 x 3.0/3.25″ tyres, you’ll be limited to 1x drivetrain setup or offset 2x options depending on rim/tyre combo used. Fork-wise we built-in plenty of clearance – you’ll be hard pushed to push the limits there!

Original spec was for the bike to use CST’s new BFT 27.5×3.0”. Chain clearance was (ahem) a little tight so we opted to swap to WTB’s slightly smaller Trailblazer 27.5×2.8” for a little extra breathing room. The upshot of which is that the Longitude now rolls with TCS tubeless ready tyres. 

The WTB’s on Jalco’s DD38 rim provide just enough chain/tyre clearance with the chain in the granny ring at the front and top sprocket at the back. No need for a Boost148 rear with this tyre/rim combo. A nice balance of width (33mm int./38mm ext.) and weight (555g), especially for a pinned rim, the Jalco’s are also tubeless-ready too, meaning valve, sealant and tape are all you need for an easy, affordable tubeless conversion. 

Production-spec with WTB’s 27.5×2.8″ Trailblazer TCS Light (Fast Rolling) fitted to the Jalco DD38 rims. We’ll update with studio images as soon as they’re through.

The Trailblazer could possibly be the ideal tyre for the Longitude with its’ fast, almost continuous raised, flat centre tread for low-rolling resistance and straight-line speed and meaty shoulder block tread for bite in loose corners and off-camber trails. Best of both worlds. 

100mm Suspension Corrected Fork

The new fork measures 483mm axle-crown with 51mm offset – i.e. suspension corrected for a 100mm 29”/27.5+ fork. Whilst the non-suspension corrected steel fork handled great, it was somewhat limiting to those tinkers that like to keep adding-on and upgrading parts. The new fork is aluminium, and for a few good reasons… A longer fork obviously needs to be stronger to help resist the increased leverage and forces. Stonger usually equals heavier (either increased fork blade diameter, wall thickness, or both) and with the newly introduced ISO test standard giving forks a particularly hard time of it at the moment, it was looking like they’d need to be even heavier than previously imagined to pass with steel. With aluminium we’ve been able to get the longer fork, add a tapered steerer, pass ISO and still drop weight vs. the original steel fork. But an aluminium fork rides harsh, right? Yes, but with the voluminous 2.8” Trailblazer upfront and the associated lower air pressures, there’s plenty of pneumatic cush to take the sting out of the trail. That’s the simple logic behind our choice for going with an aluminium fork – an ISO passable steel fork at these lengths would’ve been too heavy and detrimental to the way the bike rode – loosing that natural steel spring with stiff and heavy fork blades. As ever, it’s adnorned with triple bosses on each leg and raised front rack eyelets which are designed to clear the 27.5+ tyres.

Steel purists may bulk at the sight of the beefy bladed Aluminium fork adnorning the front of the 2016 Longitude but, as ever, it’s a carefully considered decsion with sound thinking behind it. 

Boost me

Where Boost did make sense was upfront – the wider 110x15mm spacing not only provides the necessary crown clearance for the 27.5+ setup should you want to go down the suspension fork route (the idea being 100% upgrade-friendly, without needing to buy a new front hub/wheel if adding a suspension fork at a later date), it also makes for a stiffer, stronger, wheel, improving tracking, handing and longevity, especially with the larger forces that come with the contact patch of the 27.5+ tyres.

Boost 110×15 front thru-axle for painless suspension fork future upgrade potential

Free Parable Design Gorilla Cages
We’re bundling the Longitude this year with x2pcs of the excellent Free Parable Design Gorilla Cage. They attached to each fork leg via a traditional triple bottle boss and clever plastic cleats. Easy on, easyoff, they’ll carry up to 1.5kg on each leg of whatever you can fit into their highly adjustable cradle. We have it on good authority that a bottle of wine is a great fit! Don’t just take our word for it, check out the in-depth review here from bearbonesbikepacking.co.uk.

Our thanks on these go to Miles @cyclemiles.co.uk who was kind enough to not only hook us up some samples to try (he’s the UK distro for these great products), put us in contact with Free Parable and even helped us negotiate on price. Top man!

Highly adaptable, the Free Parable Design cages will fit 1.5/2L PET bottles, bottle of wine/whiskey, a dry bag full of kit, roll mat, or whatever you can fit in it’s highly adjustable velcro webbing.

Geometry

In moving from a 29″/29+ lto a 29″/27.5+ layout we’ve been able to reign-in the chainstays somewhat (they now no longer need to accomaodate such a larger diamter tyre/wheel combo). As such the rear chainstays shrink from 458mm to 450mm. Still not super short by any stretch but a little nippier and more responsive than last years’ version, yet still plenty long enough to make it a stable, comfortable ride that climbs like a mountain goat. Stack heights are similar to last year – what we’ve lost in the headtube, we’ve gained in fork length as are reach measurements. Headangle is steepened by a degree to 69deg. No dropped toptube on here – what we give away in standover clearance we gain in front triangle space (with a view of mounting a frame bag and maximising space).

Other Features

New Shimano side-schwing frotn deraileur essentially moves allo of the bulk of the shift mechanism from the back (where it often compromised tyre clearance depending on chainstay length) to the side and right out of the way. Another bonus is the 50% reduction in shift force required. 

We’ve lost the seattube bottle boss, dropped the downtube bottle bosses (which now also acts as front derailleur and rear brake routing points) and also added a stealth dropper post port (the complete bike comes with a 31.6-27.2mm shim and 27.2mm seatpost for increased conmfort). We’ve also kept a traditional seattube cable stop also for those wanting to shift via a top-swing FD. 

It still has x2 bottle bosses – we’ve added some to the underside of the downtube

another of the 7 day 7 wonder series – Ingleheart Bikes


The beautifully-colored layers of rock of the Painted Hills are mirrored in this adventure-ready bike, designed by Igleheart Custom Frames and Forks.

You could find, own and ride this bike! Find out more at http://traveloregon.com/7bikes7wonders

From Birch and Flannel: Selling bike / giving away and encourage


from BIRCHANDFLANNEL

It’s called 7 Bikes for 7 Wonders and it is the latest campaign for Travel Oregon. To celebrate the seven wonders of Oregon, Travel Oregon connected with seven bike builders to create a one-of-a-kind bike inspired by the corresponding wonder. Each of the seven weeks of the campaign, a new bike is unveiled, then hidden the following Saturday for anyone to find and keep. A video introducing the bike is posted Monday and a clue as to the bike’s hidden whereabouts is posted Thursday. Bikes are hidden at 5am on Saturdays. The campaign is in its fifth week and all four bikes so far have been found–most within 30 minutes of being hidden.

This is a video for week four. The bike was found six minutes after being hidden.

Of course I didn’t learn about this until weeks into the campaign. Probably because my Minnesota location doesn’t keeps me from seeing promoted online content. Still, I followed along last week and it was fun. I feel like I’m living vicariously through Oregon cyclists who are searching for these bikes. If I were in Oregon, you better believe I would be camping out to search for a bike the minute it is hidden.

This is a campaign that I’m fawning over as a marketer and as a consumer. It is easy to give things away as incentives for online/offline engagement. It is not easy to generate the right kind of engagement that connects your brand with the proper consumer in an impactful way. 7 Bikes for 7 Wonders does that. I’ve been reading articles posted about people who found the first four bikes. These aren’t your typical sweepstakes professionals. Instead, they are the people you’d see if you were on a long ride over rolling hills in the country, or camp next to at a state park. It’s stellar to see deserving people find these bikes, builders getting additional deserved exposure and Oregon be the travel-bug target of cyclists and other outdoor enthusiasts.

The videos featuring bike builders connect with me. I enjoy hearing from other people who love the bicycle as much as I do. The way these bikes are built specifically for an area is the best part–a 29er for the singletracks of Mt. Hood, a road bike for the winding roads of the Columbia River Gorge. I’ve always felt bikes are the ultimate adventure machines because they allow you to experience geography like nothing else. These seven bikes will allow seven cyclists to have tailor-made rides when they experience these seven places.

If you’re reading this from Oregon, visit the Travel Oregon website and connect with them via social media so you can get in on the fun. Remember to enjoy yourself because people like me are living vicariously through you.

on board footage is the future of road racing on TV


Watch the screen above at hi res ….. this is definitely good to getting the heart rate up. The film is shot from bikes ridden by members of the Lotto-Soudal, Giant-Alpecin, LottoNL-Jumbo and Trek Factory Racing teams during Sunday’s second stage into the Ligurian capital, Genoa, where the sprint was won by Team Sky’s Elia Viviani.

Giro d’Italia organisers RCS Sport and Velon, the joint venture set up by a number of WorldTour teams last year, have reached an agreement for on-bike cameras to be used during the 98th edition of the race, which starts on the Ligurian coast this Saturday.

Footage will be recorded during eight stages of the Italian Grand Tour – the opening team time trial to San Remo, Stage 2, which is expected to finish in a sprint in Genoa, Stages 4, 9, 12 and 15, all classified as medium mountain stages, and Stages 16, featuring the Mortirolo, and 20, when the riders tackle the Colle delle Finestre.

As well as being used during TV coverage of the race, footage will also appear on the Giro’s own website as well as those of teams and media outlets – so look out for some videos from the thick of the action here on road.cc.

Race director Mauro Vegni said: “It has always been important for us to bring fans close to the action and new technologies are making it possible to bring them into the peloton and show the Giro d’Italia, the hardest race in the world’s most beautiful place, in a whole new perspective to fans all around the world.”

Velon was officially launched in November last year by 11 WorldTour teams but had already been involved in the UCI’s trial of on-bike cameras during the 2014 season.

One of its aims was to create stable, non-sponsorship revenue streams for teams, and it is understood they will benefit financially from the RCS deal.

Its members are: BMC Racing, Etixx-Quick-Step, Lampre-Merida, Lotto Soudal, Orica GreenEdge, Cannondale-Garmin, Giant-Alpecin, Lotto NL-Jumbo, Team Sky, Tinkoff-Saxo and Trek Factory Racing.

Velon’s CEO, Graham Bartlett, said: “RCS Sport have really got behind this project and we’re delighted to work with them on such an important race. The eight stages chosen will give a great insight into what it takes to win both stages and jerseys in a Grand Tour and we can’t wait to see the results.”

the eTape Caledonia 2015


What a day – the forecast was grim but the weather was grimmer. Registered the day before Saturday and it was pretty niceetape 2015 -2 Went to friends 40min away to stay the night, had a nice meal a glass or two of red and then bed by 10:30am. Alarm at 4:40am shower quick bite then drive back to Pitlochry and the start. etape 2015 -5 a train of cars arriving with bikes to park and this was at 5:45am – the last starts were at 8am. On the bike £2 in my hand to buy a quick coffee. Bumped into 2 friends as my wave was called – they were also starting but are so quick I knew i wouldn’t see them again – and I didn’t until after the finish. Boom off went – the weather was grim and I think that after 10 miles my hands and feet were frozen – and least I wouldn’t feel their complaints of ache although it made trying to drink water or eat quite difficult. Screenshot 2015-05-11 10.14.33 I worked in with a large group and it all went well – the KOM climb split the group and I found myself at the top of the mountain cycling into a 20knot head wind and rain by myself unable to catch the faster group in front.

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a photo of some grimness

Eventually 6 of us got together and worked until we caught back up at the bottom of the climb. (the sticky out bit bottom left on map) then the turn home. 2 abreast down single track roads and everyone cautious in the wet and rain. I had to stow the glasses as I couldn’t see through them which meant that my face was showered by rain spray and grit from the road. Road widen and group relaxes and Bammm the crunch of carbon as 5 or 6 riders fall. I get hemmed in behind – everyone alright apart form bruised egos … but the group is gone and again there are 8 of us playing catch up although the others are bust so just 3 of us taking turns to drag. Get to the last wee hill and kick and look at my time 3h45min – I could break 4 hours I reckon. So pedal harder and realise my right shifter has actually worked loose but my hands have been so cold I hadn’t realised it … this last section has a lot of wee rises so working the gears more with loose shifter …. last corner and finish line in sight. Over the line celebrate ease forward and realise my gps still running 4H01 but did I take it. Get back to car and official eTap text arrives congrats 2015-05-11 10.30.32 Hooray only 1min 40sec slower than last year and that was in good weather. etape 2015 -7the Bike as ever was flawless

A pile of bling
A pile of bling

Taking it easy – but what’s the drag


Sitting on the turbo doing a simple 45min spin as the RACE MTB 75km is on Saturday and I am not totally prepared. Think it will be the case of finishing ……

So turbo today

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But afterwards there is a faint plastic smell – I look around

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my initial thought it was the rear tyre – but it is a thicker turbo specific tyre so thats not the culprit ….. then i find out the error is the resistance lead for the turbo has been rubbing against the tyre for the whole ride

that isn't a highlight on the the black lead - it is metal
that isn’t a highlight on the the black lead – it is metal