Power Surf – not strictly surfing but good news to spread


Marine-Turbines-Kepler-Energy-940x564

Tidal power, which could make a considerably energy contribution, has long been the goal of scientists the world over. But while many have dreamed, few have delivered in harnessing the ocean’s strength. As a result tidal energy has lagged far behind solar and wind powers with typical barriers cited as cost, hostile saltwater environment and damage to existing marine life.

That could all be set to change thanks to a British start up, Kepler Energy, who have developed a brand new form of water generator harking back to a traditional water mill. It is predicted the cost of operating, building and delivering energy could be cheaper than that of wind farms and other renewable energy at present.

Costs will be cheaper than lagoons and in time we will be cheaper than offshore wind generation

“Costs will be cheaper than lagoons and in time we will be cheaper than offshore wind generation. Furthermore, investment risk is manageable since turbines are added incrementally to form the fence, with each one generating revenue as it is added.” said Peter Dixon, Chairman of Kepler Energy.

The Kepler patented ‘Transverse Horizontal Axis Water Turbine (THAWT)’ is able to operate in lower velocity and shallower waters than traditional axial turbines and the company are planning the process to ensure that it bears no significant risk to marine life and other users of the sea.

Each turbine is modular and can start producing electricity as soon as it is in position. As more sections are added the power return increases exponentially with a 10km run being likened to a small nuclear reactor.

Kepler are planning a trial 30MW tidal energy fence that will be located in the Bristol Channel, most likely to be located in the Aberthaw to Minehead stretch of water. They are hoping this will be operational by 2020/21.

To find out more visit www.keplerenergy.co.uk

The Pros and Cons of Coffee from SUP magazine


Photo: Erik Aeder

PADDLE HEALTHY: THE PROS AND CONS OF CAFFEINE

With energy drink marketing increasing its reach, the continued spread of Starbucks and the rise of craft coffee houses (complete with bearded baristas), our culture has become more caffeinated than ever before. So, is all this caffeine good for us, or are we drinking too much as recent investigations into deaths that may be caffeine related suggest? What are the performance benefits of our favorite natural stimulant, and what are the pitfalls? Is naturally derived caffeine better than the stuff cooked up in a lab? We’re going to do our best to answer these questions.

Photo: Mike Tavares

THE BENEFITS OF BREWING ANOTHER CUP

The good news is that in moderate quantities, caffeine can help your paddling and recovery. Caffeine is one of the most highly researched exercise aids, so there’s a ton of useful data on how it positively impacts sports performance if not consumed in excess. Ingesting a moderate amount of caffeine before exercise has been shown to increase endurance for workouts lasting an hour or longer by slowing glycogen (stored carbs) depletion and encouraging the body to burn fat, leaving more glycogen for later. In addition, nutritional scientists at the University of Illinois found that caffeine also decreases exercise-related anxiety, which may dull pain perception and so further boost endurance.

For river-running standup paddler and kayaker Haley Mills, pre-race caffeine is a must. “I sometimes have multiple events in a weekend and drinking espresso before each one helps me feel more aggressive on the water and focused on the tricks I’m doing,” she says. “I have poor circulation in my hands and feet and when I drink coffee I feel there’s more blood flow to those areas, which helps me stay warmer.”

And the benefits aren’t limited to during exercise. Research published in the Journal of Applied Physiologyproved that when consumed with a carb-rich post workout snack, smoothie or meal, caffeine can help restore the glycogen lost during physical activity. So don’t second guess having that second Americano of the day after you hit the water, as long as you’re combining it with the right 3:1 mix of carbs and a fast-acting protein such as whey.

Naturally derived caffeine comes from various sources, which typically have additional health perks. Coffee has been shown to prevent macular degeneration and Alzheimer’s, while black tea reduces inflammation and exercise-related soreness, and green tea takes down free radicals, enhances brain function and promotes fat burning.

Photo: Aaron Schmidt

CAFFEINE CONCERNS

Despite the science behind using caffeine as an ergogenic performance aid, it’s possible to misuse and abuse it to the detriment of your health. Common results from overconsumption include stomachache, sickness and diarrhea, headaches, nervousness/anxiety, acid reflux, and racing/irregular heartbeat.

While java junkies can certainly get a dodgy stomach from one too many refills, much of the concern surrounding excess caffeine centers on so-called “energy drinks” and shots. For people who don’t like the taste of coffee or tea, such drinks can seem like a legitimate alternative. And, with millions of marketing dollars poured into making the connection between extreme sports and energy drinks, caffeine-in-a-can products are expected to soar to $21 billion in annual revenue by 2017.

So are energy drinks worse for you than natural caffeine options? Not always, but many contain high quantities of sugar and artificial sweeteners, colors, and preservatives. As ever, if you can’t pronounce an ingredient or don’t know what the heck it is, it’s probably best to steer clear.

Part of the issue is that the small size of energy “shots” is deceptive. Some people think because the container is diminutive it doesn’t contain much caffeine, so they can just pound back several in one go. This assumption is wrong and, according to certain reports, it may be dead wrong, as a single energy shot can contain as much caffeine as a medium coffee. Would you line up six coffees and drink them all? Probably not–especially if they had a bunch of synthetic junk in them.

Another issue is that synthetic caffeine often found in energy drinks and shots is made in a lab using a wide range of substances that include petroleum and urea (a component of urine—we know, gross!) Some experts argue that synthetic caffeine is absorbed more quickly, leading to a quicker caffeine ‘high’ and sharper ‘crash’ that may aggravate underlying health issues. While the jury is still out on the effects of energy drinks, we advise sticking to natural caffeine sources, just to play it safe.

Photo: Harry Wiewel

HOW MUCH DO YOU NEED AND WHEN?

Many studies suggest that optimal caffeine before a workout is 0.5 to 1.5 mg of caffeine per pound of bodyweight. So, if you weigh 150 pounds, you’d need between 70 and 210 milligrams of caffeine in the hours leading up to training or a race, and the same afterwards with your post-exercise nutrition. According to Caffeine Informer, that’s the equivalent of between one and three espresso shots, or somewhere between one small and two large cups of coffee.

Though such a recommendation is based on experiments conducted with endurance athletes, everyone’s body is different. Our advice is to play around with how much caffeine you need, using the minimum needed to make a difference. Also, try occasionally going caffeine free for a few days so your body’s dependence on it doesn’t blunt caffeine’s positive effects.

Unravelling of the Casio G-Shock Riseman GW9200


Let the pictures do the talking

box

nice clean display

Initial thoughts are really good – things I love so far

1.Dual time shows current time as well as does stopwatch and timer.

2.Clean display.

3.Watch face drains water – like the frogman but unlike the 5600 series.

4.Great buttons – not stiff like the Mudman and better quality than the 5600 series.

5. Atomic Timekeeping

6. Solar Powered

Absolute Hunger


Went to the gym to do an hour steady high cadence cycle – I sometimes prefer the gym for this because:

a) I can watch Bored to Death and giggle chuckle my way through 2 episodes .

b) It is dark outside and Baghdad potholes can swallow the unwary (and small wheeled bicycles)

c) the brompton pedals are plain flats so can’t pull up on the pedal (robbing that precious 1/3rd of muscle that should be exercised.

Then weirdly I started craving food – a craving like ‘I have done 5 hrs of the enduro and I must eat NOW’ so couldn’t help or distract myself and cut off after 45mins ….

So a bit annoyed with myself and think my portion might have been on the galactic side of normal. If you want to know Vegetable curry with some slices of chicken breast. Diced raw tomato pepper and onion salad (mmm nice breath) and some red kidney beans …. so carbs and protein.

Have you been put off exercise lately through any cravings? Tell me about it?