New Year Weight


This year like last year has seen my weight hit the post xmas not good limit …. early 2015 was a 2 week drinking cocktail with breakfast holiday in Cuba and this year has been Xmas at home with kids – how much beer and food can I enjoy

So 3kg up on what I want …. 73kg in 175cm so BMI still says healthy – but the mind says no … BMI calculator

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Then read this in the Radavist and my mind is opening up to possibilities …. WATCH THIS SPACE

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Over the past few years – since moving to Austin in 2010 – I’ve been struggling with weight loss. Look, we’re all cyclists. We probably all ride with skinny, fit dudes and as a bigger guy, it’s frustrating. Even now, at the peak of my fitness, I still get dropped by “climbers”. What I found was to take these experiences and use them as part of my motivation. There was one defining moment however. A majority of it came from a ride I did in Australia a few years back…


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Granted, this ride was really tough. Two, 100-120 mile days with over 15,000′ elevation a day in the Australian summer. I didn’t bonk, but it took me forever to climb, then I laid down and rested for 3-5 minutes. No big deal. It did however lend itself as an opportunity for Andy to make some sort of comment along the lines of “you’ve got big lungs and long legs, if you got in shape, you’d be a strong rider.”

From there, something burned inside me and I’m not talking about a hot pizza slice. I wanted to be able to enjoy tough rides and be fit enough to carry camera gear with me, or sprint up ahead to set up a photo. I wanted to up my game.

I began thinking about what I was eating. Instead of getting BBQ after a ride, I ate lean protein and salads. Instead of drinking beer, I switched solely to bourbon and instead of riding at a comfortable pace solo, I began pushing myself.

It took over two years before people began to see a noticeable difference in my fitness.

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Here I am in 2012, racing cross. I probably weighed around 215 here, down from 225.

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2013, around 210.

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2013, opening weekend of cross season, right at 190lbs.

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Now, in 2014 I fluctuate between 175 and 185, depending on what I’m riding, how often and hydration levels. “Race weight” is 175, sitting on my ass driving a pickup truck down the PCH and traveling to see family for a month weight is 185.

That’s over four years of steady, slow weight loss. Any doctor I’ve talked to has told me that is the key. Weight loss should come from a lifestyle change, from diet, to physical exercise and it should happen over time. If you rush it, you’ll do your body more harm than good.

That said, here are the main changes I made with my lifestyle. Granted, you shouldn’t try to go all in here. Just make small changes. Cutting yourself off from your favorite foods sucks. Instead, treat them as a reward. Really love burgers? Reward yourself after a tough ride with a burger. Just don’t keep eating burgers every single day!

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Here we go. Healthy helps. These are my normal meals:

Breakfast: a 1/2 – 1 cup of oatmeal with blueberries, toasted almonds, cinnamon and water. Simple. Or quinoa with a fried egg. Yolk and all.

Lunch: I have two lunches, the post-ride lunch and busy day lunch.
-Post-ride: fish tacos (grilled) or a salad with fish on top.
-Busy day, no ride: Fresh soup and tortilla chips. Even canned soup is good, just watch the sodium.

Dinner: I love the shit out of greens. Bok Choy, kale, chard spinach. Sauteed, steamed, whatever. I eat a good portion of greens every day. That’s a given. Fresh fish from the market, cooked on a skillet. Sweet potatoes, squash, brown rice, quinoa. Whatever. If you like Whole Foods, look into the “Health Starts Here” food items. Hell, try to go vegetarian.

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Photo by Margus Riga

Ride a lot, often. The shorter, sweeter rides are better than always doing 60+ rides. I’ll go out on the road bike in the morning for 20 miles and then the mountain bike at night sometimes for the same. Mix your riding up. Mountain bikes rule because they wipe out your entire body. Give yourself time to recover. If your legs are sore, do a recovery spin. Don’t go out hammering away.

Don’t overdo it. You can literally ride yourself into trouble.

That said, big rides help in weight loss for sure. I still do one or two big rides a month. Eat on the bike, but avoid mass-produced bars. Instead, go for foods like avocado, almonds, mangos, almond butter, etc. Sweets are ok on the bike, so relish them! Just remember, if you eat foods high in cholesterol, you’re not helping your body.

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Drinking.

Fuck beer. Seriously. It’s the worst. If you’re trying to lose weight, stop drinking beer! It’s tough, but that stuff is like drinking dead calories. You might as well be eating pizza every night.

Bourbon has the least amount of calories than any other liquor. It has no additives, no flavoring, it’s a mash in a charred oak barrel and that’s where it gets its flavoring. Vodka is also good. Drink it on the rocks, or neat. Mixing with ginger ale or ginger beer is horrible for you. Look at how much sugar is in ginger ale!

If you’re going to drink beer, drink shitty, “light” beer.

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Snacking. Buy almonds, salted is fine. They’re great for you. Just don’t eat an entire bag. I usually snack on a handful if I’m hungry. Or eat a banana. If I am craving something sweet, I literally drink a thing of Skratch.

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Finally, recovery! I used to do nothing for recovery, aside from trying to eat in 30 minutes of finishing a ride. Now, when I finish a ride, I take a plant-based protein mix. Doing so has really helped me build lean, healthy muscle.

Normal protein has so much added shit in it, makes you feel bloated, swells your muscles and it always made me gassy. This stuff is amazing. Vanilla is my favorite.

Self
Photo by Kyle Kelley

I know that didn’t read much as a guide book to losing weight, it’s more of an explanation as to how I lost weight. Look, it’s not easy, don’t be fooled. There’s a lot of times that I want to gorge on pizza, or eat nonstop. You will be hungry, a lot. It’s tough, but you’ve really just got to ‘shrink your stomach’ and your appetite.

Like training on the bike, you’ve got to train yourself to eat well, in order to be well. Yes, I still eat breakfast tacos, or pizza, or burgers, but a lot less than I did. Remember, it’s about a happy medium.

 

Will the apple watch shake up the GPS and app market?


In addition to being a wearable emoji-sender, heartbeat-sharer, and payment system, the Apple Watch will also be a fitness tracker. And although the watch won’t be available until early 2015, Apple provided a few details on how the wearable will track activity. The watch has its own accelerometer and heart-rate monitor, but it needs to be paired with an iPhone to track your distance traveled via GPS or Wi-Fi.

These features are of note because they add a new set of functions to Apple’s hardware stable, and they directly compete with offerings from long-time hardware partners who already make fitness tracking wearables like Jawbone, Fitbit and Garmin.

The Apple Watch has some standard features familiar to the fitness crowd. Its built-in Activity app has three modes, all of which display goals in a ring-shaped interface. In the “Move” display, it shows you how much you’ve been in motion during the day, gives you a running countdown to your 30-minute goal, and shows how many calories you’ve burned. The “Stand” display reminds you to stop sitting for at least a minute every 12 hours (see the photo above), and the “Exercise” ring will gauge harder-core activities like running.

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There’s also a separate Workout app that can break your activities into more-specific groups, such as Running, Cycling, or Cross Training. All your stats and workout history are stored in a Fitness app, which gives you a dashboard of your workout sessions. You can share your workout stats with third-party apps via the watch’s Health app, too.

Even though all of that is standard-issue stuff for a fitness tracker, Apple’s HealthKit initiative is likely to play a major part in making all that workout data usable by other apps on your iPhone, iPad, or Apple Watch. The software package for developers will likely speed the growth of the ecosystem of apps built for the watch—though Apple has been largely silent on details about how or when those third-party apps will make their way onto its Watch.

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A great Story


I am slightly (i have to admit) Fattist but this story made me proud of the guy and slightly ashamed of my attitude to others ….

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A lot of Americans are struggling to lose a whole lot of weight, and they try all kinds of crazy things.

Ernest Gagnon — a man from Billerica, Mass. — decided to shed pounds by getting into the often intense, high-adrenaline sport of cyclocross: racing road bikes on obstacle courses.

Two years ago, Gagnon tipped the scales at 570 pounds. He was depressed and embarrassed to leave the house.

“Being as big as I was, I really felt like I didn’t belong anywhere,” Gagnon says. “I was stuck in my house for almost 10 years, just going to my work and back.”

Back then, Gagnon’s diabetes was getting more serious. He was losing the circulation to his legs, and his doctors were talking about gastric bypass surgery.

Then, some sort of a switch flipped in his head and Gagnon decided he was going to race bikes, something he’d wanted to do since he was a kid.

Gagnon contacted Cosmo Catalano, a cyclist from Hartford, Conn., on Facebook, and asked if he wanted to go for a bike ride.

“He’s like … ‘by the way, I ride kind of slow … I’m 500 whatever pounds,’ ” Catalano says. “I [said] … ‘OK, I can deal with that.’ ”

This is how hundreds of New England cyclocross racers met Gagnon.

The First Race

Now, just two years after making that decision, Gagnon met up with his bike racer buddies in Lancaster, Mass., to do his very first race, called the Midnight Ride of Cyclocross.

These days, at age 33, Gagnon is 240 pounds slimmer. He is still very big by any standard, but a lot less so. Seeing him, surrounded by svelte, Lycra-clad athletes, squeezed into some spandex of his own, is a little bit jarring at first.

Ernest Gagnon competes in his first cyclocross race, the Midnight Ride of Cyclocross, on Sept. 26, in Lancaster, Mass.

Sam Evans-Brown/New Hampshire Public Radio

As you watch him, however, you start to get used to the big guy in bike shorts, especially when you realize that Gagnon himself is way past being self-conscious.

“You know, I’m riding in spandex in Boston with these guys. Never thought I could do that [and] it’s liberating in a way,” Gagnon says. “It really [forces] you to be honest with yourself, accept who you are; because if you can’t accept who you are, you can’t do anything.”

Before the race, Gagnon goes for a ride around the course with his lieutenant, Catalano, who gives him tips about how to ride it. Gagnon rides along on a custom-built titanium bike that is reinforced to hold his weight.

After checking out the course, he lines up in at the start in a crowd of 60 other racers, and after a few nervous, final moments the race is off.

The racers hurtle along dirt paths, and through soccer fields on bikes designed for racing on pavement. There are obstacles in the course like barriers that they have to jump over, or steep hills they run up with the bikes on their shoulders.

The slender, athletic racers are panting and working hard. For Gagnon, however, it’s actually physically dangerous. He has angina, and his doctor told him not to let his heart rate get too high during the race, or he could end up in the hospital; something that has happened before.

Everybody at the race knows about Gagnon, and throughout the race the announcer gives little updates on his progress.

“Two laps to go for Ernest Gagnon,” the announcer says, “nicely done Ernest — hang in there!”

After 40 minutes, Gagnon finishes dead last. Catalano and friend Steve Lachance quickly join him near the finish line.

“I told you you could do it, I told you you could do it!” Lachance says.

A steady stream of folks Gagnon barely knows, some of the 5,500 Facebook friends who have sought him out after hearing about his story, come by to congratulate him.

Gagnon says there isn’t a weight goal he’s aiming for; he just wants to be healthy. He’s already eying a couple more cyclocross races to do later this year.

how fit are you?


Do this test

https://www.worldfitnesslevel.org/#/

answer truthfully now.

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there is no way my VO2 is 62 – my polar HRM used to say it was around 57-59

 

What is your fitness age?


good article from WELL in the NYT ….

Trying to quantify your aerobic fitness is a daunting task. It usually requires access to an exercise-physiology lab. But researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim have developed a remarkably low-tech means of precisely assessing aerobic fitness and estimating your “fitness age,” or how well your body functions physically, relative to how well it should work, given your age.

The researchers evaluated almost 5,000 Norwegians between the ages of 20 and 90, using mobile labs. They took about a dozen measurements, including height, body mass index, resting heart rate, HDL and total cholesterol levels. Each person also filled out a lengthy lifestyle questionnaire. Finally, each volunteer ran to the point of exhaustion on a treadmill to pinpoint his or her peak oxygen intake (VO2 max), or how well the body delivers oxygen to its cells. VO2 max has been shown in large-scale studies to closely correlate with significantly augmented life spans, even among the elderly or overweight. In other words, VO2 max can indicate fitness age.

In order to figure out how to estimate VO2 max without a treadmill, the scientists combed through the results to determine which of the data points were most useful. You might expect that the most taxing physical tests would yield the most reliable results. Instead, the researchers found that putting just five measurements — waist circumference; resting heart rate; frequency and intensity of exercise; age; and sex — into an algorithm allowed them to predict a person’s VO2 max with noteworthy accuracy, according to their study, published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

The researchers used the data set to tabulate the typical, desirable VO2 max for a healthy person at every age from 20 to 90, creating specific parameters for fitness age. The concept is simple enough, explains Ulrik Wisloff, the director of the K. G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Norwegian University and the senior author of the study. “A 70-year-old man or woman who has the peak oxygen uptake of a 20-year-old has a fitness age of 20,” he says. He has seen just this combination during his research.

The researchers have used all of this data to create an online calculator that allows people to determine their VO2 max without going to a lab. You’ll need your waist measurement and your resting heart rate. To determine it, sit quietly for 10 minutes and check your pulse; count for 30 seconds, double the number and you have your resting heart rate. Plug these numbers, along with your age, sex and frequency and intensity of exercise, into the calculator, and you’ll learn your fitness age.

The results can be sobering. A 50-year-old man, for instance, who exercises moderately a few times a week, sports a 36-inch waist and a resting heart rate of 75 — not atypical values for healthy middle-aged men — will have a fitness age of 59. Thankfully, unwanted fitness years, unlike the chronological kind, can be erased, Dr. Wisloff says. Exercise more frequently or more intensely. Then replug your numbers and exult as your “age” declines. A youthful fitness age, Dr. Wisloff says, “is the single best predictor of current and future health.”

and my result …?

Screen Shot 2013-11-01 at 12.27.36boll*cks – in my dreams

 

last nights 5 a side


Anaerobic Exercise

Anaerobic exercise is exercise intense enough to trigger anaerobic metabolism. It is used by athletes in non-endurance sports to promote strength, speed and power and by body builders to build muscle mass. Muscle energy systems trained using anaerobic exercise develop differently compared to aerobic exercise, leading to greater performance in short duration, high intensity activities, which last from mere seconds up to about 2 minutes.

Then i guess this counts

strava screen

 

Using a TENS machine (well the EMS part) for sports injury


Today i shocked myself as advised by the yoga therapist …..

If you’ve had a muscle injury, there’s every chance you’ll benefit from EMS devices at surgeries, hospitals and gyms – that’s because they are commonly used to treat muscle groups affected by sports injuries.
Most EMS devices contain sport programmes and recovery programmes to effectively relieve minor aches and pains from your muscle workout.

A rehabilitation program should be designed with seven essential principles in mind: 2 main objectives and individual long and short-term goals.

Principles of sports rehabilitation:

  • Avoid aggravation – do not make the injury worse during the rehabilitation
  • Timing – rehabilitation should be started as soon as it is possible without aggravating the injury
  • Compliance – it is imperative you carry out the rehabilitation program in its entirety
  • Individualization – each athlete is different. The rehabilitation response will vary from patient to patient
  • Specific sequencing – incorporate all components of physical fitness as part of your rehabilitation program
  • Intensity – without aggravating the injury rehab should challenge you and progress your fitness
  • Total patient – it is important not to just focus on the injured part but to offer a holistic overall body rehab approach

The 2 main objectives of sports rehabilitation are:

  • Prevent deconditioning as a result of the injury
  • Rehabilitate the injured part

How EMS Works 
EMS devices have become quite popular in sports injury rehabilitation. When a person has a muscle injury, the electrical current produced by the EMS machine stimulates the muscles. This stimulation triggers repairing of the muscle tissue.

Electronic Muscle Stimulation Devices produce electrical signals that stimulate the nerves. The devices are normally connected to the patient through electrodes that are held in place with adhesive. By placing the pads on a certain set of muscles, and then sending the impulses via the EMS unit, the muscles will react by contracting and relaxing. The resulting contractions are much like the contractions that take place during regular exercise.

Depending on the area that requires treatment, a practitioner can switch the voltage for different pressure points on the muscle. The low voltage reduces pain and stimulates the muscle tissue. EMS devices help stimulate muscle tissue that may not be affected by regular exercise routines. They will stimulate damaged muscle tissues resulting in repairing, toning, and strengthening of the damaged tissue. Wherever the tissues are damaged, EMA devices will stimulate the fibers to various degrees and patterns. These patterns will create a different response from the contraction. Programs are designed to improve exhaustion resistance, endurance, and promote muscle healing. The purpose of using EMS on athletes is to shorten recovery time so they can return to the sport.

Cycle commuters healthier than those that drive or take the bus


bike commuters

from the great ride.cc

Commuting by car or public transport is bad for your health, that’s the not very shocking conclusion of a Swedish public health survey in to the commuting habits of 21,000 people which has been published in the journal BMC Public Health

The snappily titled “Detection Relationship between commuting and health outcomes in a cross-sectional population survey in southern Sweden” was carried out by researchers from Lund University gathered information on full time workers aged between 18 and 65 in southern Sweden. In a press release explaining their findings Erik Hansseen from the university’s division of occupational and environmental medicine said:

“Generally car and public transport users suffered more everyday stress, poorer sleep quality, exhaustion and, on a seven point scale, felt that they struggled with their health compared to the active commuters.

“The negative health of public transport users increased with journey time. However, the car drivers who commuted 30 – 60 minutes experienced worse health than those whose journey lasted more than one hour.”

While most of this might seem confirmation of the staggeringly obvious the Lund researchers say that all might not be as it seems. They point out, (we’d like to imagine while leaning forward at their desks and pressing their fingertips together before possibly taking their rimless glasses off for a quick polish), that some of the health outcomes might relate to the economic circumstances of their research subjects as much as their chosen methods of commuting. Thus poorer people might be more likely to commute by public transport, but their health would also be adversely affected by the very fact of being poor. However the economic argument doesn’t necessarily explain why cyclists and walkers are healthier other than the active nature of their commutes. While in the UK cyclists are generally slightly more affluent than the general population that may or may not be true for Southern Sweden. Pedestrians are likely to be drawn from all economic strata of a society.

That they say, probably while staring out of the lab window at a fiord (do they have those in Sweden – ed), might also explain one of the seeming anomalies of the research, that commuters who drove for over an hour to work were more relaxed and less stressed than those that drove for under an hour. This they posit could be down to the relaxing nature of driving through Southern Sweden or the fact that people driving longer distances could be more affluent, high achieving males who didn’t really have very much to worry about anyway.

The Lund researchers conclude that more research is needed to tease this knotty one out. Well fancy that.

Five Seed Warm-Cool Muscle Rub (via All Seasons Cyclist)


Seems good – will try source some in the UK – think muscle rollers may be more beneficial though ….

Five Seed Warm-Cool Muscle Rub One of the reasons many people don’t ride their bikes as much as they would like to is because of “sore muscles.” Their problems really start before they even get on the bike—most newbies forget to stretch before they ride. They often add to their pain by having their saddle at the wrong height and when they get home they are too tired to stretch after the ride, let alone pay attention to eating the proper food for recovery. If you don’t properly … Read More

via All Seasons Cyclist

What cycling does for the UK economy


From ROAD.CC

Dr Alexander Grous, a productivity and innovation specialist in the Centre of Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics has published a report that shows cycling produces £2.9bn every year in total benefit to the UK economy.

Titled The British Cycling Economy ‘Gross Cycling Product’ Report the 17 page document shows how the the growth of cycling over the last five years, with high profile sporting success in Beijing besides, is continuing to effectively pump real money into UK plc’s bank balance.

The report is sponsored by Sky and British Cycling with Sky’s Group Director of Corporate Affairs Graham McWilliam starting off plainly in his welcome, “We believe this is the first-ever attempt to chart the full extent of cycling’s contribution to the British economy” with Dr Grous continuing in the introduction that having attempted to quantify the contribution of all aspects of cycling, he’s calculated that each individual cyclist’s personal contribution as a result of their riding is £230 per year.

Key points:

•   £2.9b total contribution to UK economy

•   28 per cent increase in volume of cycle sales in 2010, generating £1.62b

•   £853m further contribution to the UK economy through the purchase of cycling accessories and bicycle maintenance, resulting in total retail sector sales of £2.47bn

•   Over £500m generated in wages and £100m in taxes from 23,000 employed directly in bicycle sales, distribution and the maintenanceof cycling infrastructure

•   Health benefits save the economy £128m per year in absenteeism
Even more significant, though:

•   Frequent and regular cyclists could further save the economy £2b over a ten-year period in terms of reduced absenteeism

•   A 20 per cent increase in current cycling levels by 2015 could save the economy £207m in terms of reduced traffic congestion and £71m in terms of lower pollution levels

•   Latent demand for cycling could amount to around £516m of untapped economic potential for the UK

Certainly sections like “more cyclists equals less time off work’ should see this report zinging into the inboxes of bosses and human resources departments across the country this morning – in fact, why don’t we do that right now?

Brompton – a cure for life


“That’s so cute,” exclaimed a non-Bromptonite upon spying my Brompton. “Make no mistake,” I countered, “this is a serious machine capable of establishing world peace.”

I had made my choice to cycle in a place where everyone drove big cars of at least 4 or 5 litres …. I was loaned one of these monsters but my soul was dying and crying to be set free … I wanted my bike (well truth be told any of them) but then plane travel and desire made me choose the Brompton

My world now consists of cyclist and non-cyclist and more specifically Bromptonites and non-Bromptonites. The Brompton can save our planet, especially for city dwellers. For starters you can carry it, folded, past British train personnel without irking their wrath, indignation or refusal to let you board. Once folded you can take it just about anywhere. Pubs, offices, trains, tubes, offices, restaurants, clothes shops, coffee haunts and even in the boot of a car.

In a Brompton future everyone will be fit and healthy – the maximum weight a Brompton can carry is 110 kg (242 pounds) – not many will fall outside of this category apart from rugby players, heavy weight boxers and the morbidly obeses with their personal feeders. Not many people break the ‘point one of a tonne’, 100 kg (220 pounds) or 16 stone, which means almost everyone could ride a Brompton. It is a beautiful and functional machine that may not have the best ride of any bike on the planet (Salsa Mutluk perhaps) but it is nippy, comfortable and a feat of engineering.

Expensive but worth it and a small price to save the planet.

How good is 5 a side footie as a workout


Played another game last night and I don’t think I can remember the last time I was so puffed out from exercise. I cycled there to warm up – that’s the first 15 min or the heart rate chart. Then warm up and then the game – an hour of hard exercise.

It’s all in the high aerobic / anaerobic level where there is basically attrition on the body – but exercise that allows you to develop sprint and muscular ability by wearing you down. The dips in HR are my 4 stints in goal – pretty defined by a marked drop…. The last section is the cycle home with bruised shins and tired limbs – even friendly games can be pretty brutal sometimes.

HRmax 180 training effort 4.6

Noticed when uploading the suunto T6 data into moves count that nearly half the exercise counts as maximal, with a training effort of 4.6

. In their literature they say ….

4. Highly improving Training Effect This workout highly improves your aerobic performance, if repeated 1 to 2 times per week. In order to achieve optimal development, it requires 2 to 3 recuperative workouts (with a Training Effect of 1–2) per week.
5. Over-reaching Training Effect This workout helps you greatly improve your aerobic performance, but only if followed by a sufficient recuperation period. Training at this level requires an extremely high level of exertion and should not be performed often.

So easy exercise for me if I get another chance for any before going overseas for work next week.

What exercise have you that was much harder than you thought?

5 a side football (soccer) – and what it does for you aerobically and anaerobically


Played football (not to be confused with that American game played with hands and an egg shaped ball HANDEGG?) last night for the first time in months. I had given up after a brutal kicking one night but headed the call when short of players and popped down to Firhill where the games are played on astroturk and the boards at the side ensure that games don’t stop (unless you catch a breather in goal.

Put on the Suunto t6c to see what workout I got in an hour and I was pretty surprised at the result. Definitely in the anaerobic camp of exercise.

summary

Heart Rate average was 149 but this includes time in goal – HR max was 180 (not bad I thought my HRmax was high 170 odd)

Heart Rate

You can see brief warm up then game on – following a goal we normally change goalies and you can see where I went in (and the long nearly 10min stint where I didn’t concede a goal) then out again and later on another shorter goalkeeper stint.

What also surprised me was my predicted VO2 reading of 49 ….

VO2

Here is some blurb gleaned from the internet …. my VO2 should be higher if I can do a sub40 10km race …. (52??)

Here’s how to use the number to make some predictions in your race times and your mortality
If your VO2max is less than the number listed by your age, your decreased fitness is at least as risky as smoking one pack of cigarettes per day or having diabetes or hypertension.

 

Age 20-39             36.75  less than this is as risky as smoking cigarettes
40-49                   34.65

50-59                    30.80

60 and up       26.65

 

  In addition, a VO2 max check-up can give you some idea of what to expect in an upcoming 10K.  For instance, if your VO2max is approximately 40, you should be able to run the 10K in about 50 minutes.  With a VO2max of 45, you should cruise through a 10-K course at about 45:15.  At 50, you’ll run a 41:20, at 55 you’ll post about 38:06, at 60 you do about 35:30,   65 gives you 33 minutes, and 70 equals 31 minutes flat.

Goodbye Garmin


Not bad for a working week – working 7 days a week so fitting in the exercise is important. Trying to get over an hour a day of exercise – really want to lose some weight and get a bit quicker … my runs have been slow since the cold.

This is a goodbye to Garmin Training Log as well as moving on to Movescount the Suunto calendar and community page. Just sold the Garmin 405 to a pal and looking forward to trying out the Suunto T6C which should be waiting for me at home.