Reblog Data crunch the TDF by numbers 2016


July 26, 2016 – The 2016 Tour de France wrapped up on Sunday with Chris Froome (SKY) celebrating his third overall win of this prestigious race.

Graphics/Words by Dimension Data || Image by Yuzuru Sunada

Additionally, Dimension Data produced a final infographic based on the information obtained through its data analytics technology that tracked each riders’ journey across the 21 stages. Here’s a quick snapshot of race analytics:

1. The riders conquered 80 km/h winds, 3 rainy finishes, 1 hail storm and 1 day of 35C/95F heat.
2. Stage 11 was the fastest with an average speed of 46.65 km/h while Stage 18 was the slowest speed at 29.58 km/h.
3. Riders climbed a total of 8,500 m in elevation of categorized climbs in the Alps which is equal to 26 Eiffel Towers.
4. Dimension Data Big Data truck traveled 4,892.5 km and processed 127.8 million data records in its cloud.

The 22-person data team used 12 collaboration tools to work with colleagues around the world and coordinate a 24-hour testing and development cycle to keep up with the race. You can view Dimension Data’s graphic list of facts from the 2016 Tour de France above.

tour-de-france-stages-121-it-takes-a-team-to-win-the-tour-1-1024

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Strava insights – US focus but still an interesting read


In 2015, 5.3 activities were uploaded and shared on the social network every second.

Data trackers extraordinaire Strava has published its annual end of year insights for 2015, and there is some pretty info in the report.

Comprising millions of individual uploaded rides, the data offers unique insight into the habits and behavior of cyclists in the United States. For example in 2015, 5.3 activities were uploaded and shared on the social network every second.

This immense depth of data allows documentation and analysis of Strava’s growth in the world of cycling and running in the United States, while also providing direct comparison with the Strava community on a global scale. Here’s a breakdown of some of the most interesting information.

2015 Highlights
  • Globally, Strava athletes uploaded 5.3 activities every second
  • Over 26 million rides uploaded in the U.S.
  • Average speed for U.S. male cyclist is 14.6 mph, female U.S. cyclist is 12.7 mph ­
  • Average cycling commuter distance in U.S. is 10.5 miles
Global Cycling

Across Strava’s global platform, cyclists shared a total of 115.8 million rides in 2015, accruing a total of nearly 2.6 billon miles — almost enough for a one-way trip to Neptune. Strava’s cyclists together accumulated 133 billion vertical feet in elevation gain.

Strava 2015 Insights

U.S. Cycling

Cycling uploads on Strava continue to grow and grow as riders in the U.S. logged 26,320,103 individual rides throughout the year, logging 539,112,239 miles along the way. Saturday, July 11 proved to be the year’s most popular day for a ride. From the hills of Vermont to the high Rockies of Colorado, riders in the U.S. climbed an 25.6 billion vertical feet.

For average distance, men recorded 23 miles for each ride, while women averaged 20 miles. The average ride time was yet another significant difference, as the men’s 1:54:00 put them in the saddle for longer than the women, who registered 1:38:00 in comparison. Women recorded an average speed of 12.7 mph for an individual ride, with men registering 14.6 mph.

Not known as a traditional cycling state, Louisiana emerged as surprisingly the fastest state, with an average speed of 15.2 mph, joined by flatland Florida atop the ranking for longest average ride with 24.2 miles. Also surprisingly, Vermont topped Colorado and California as the biggest climbers, with 1,460 vertical feet gained per ride.

Strava 2015 Insights

Strava also revealed that California was the most active state in the U.S., with 7,172,721 rides logged, a considerable margin of difference over its nearest rival, Colorado, where they totaled 1,465,414. Sausalito, California, was home to the most popular segment in the U.S. in 2015, with 15,327 attempts on the “7-11 Bump.”

Bike Commuting

For many Strava members, commuting is a large part of their daily routine, with an average of 95,878 rides recorded as commutes to and from work every week. A pacey average of 15.0 mph ensured riders made it in on time, tackling an average 10.5 miles door-to-door. Winter was an unappealing affair for many, axing commuter activity by 63.3 percent as people returned to more comfortable methods of transport.

“This latest release of Strava’s data demonstrates once again the great depth of insight which is available when collating the activities of the world’s cyclists and runners,” says Andrew Vontz, Strava brand manager. “The Strava story offers us an unprecedented opportunity to analyze and interpret a broad spectrum of data, helping to understand behavior and habits of athletes in the United States; as well as providing real-world feedback on how people utilize their local roads for both exercising and commuting.”

The tour de France in numbers


  • More than 10,000 cyclists have taken part In the Tour de France since it started.
    • it is estimated they have covered more than 350,000km.
    • At 5,745km, the 1926 Tour was the longest.
      • Three Tour riders have died while racing (Francisco Cepeda, Tom Simpson and Fabio Casartelli).
      • The youngest winner was Henri Comet, who won in 1904 at the age of 20.
        • France has won the race 36 times, followed by Belgium with 18 wins.

March Monthly Update – Stats


Had a busy work filled month – my efforts to average 1hr/day sadly failed

Will make an effort to do more next month – but despite this setback on the exercise front I am very chuffed that so many people read this disparate and weird blog – below is the WordPress Stats ….. so to all you out there thank you very much.

 

Wordpress Readers

 

 

To help us choose …. Best Kitesurf spots around the world based on wind stats


Windy Kiteboarding Months

Here is a guide to windy kiteboarding months – it is difficult to accumulate a full list, as this is compiled from many sources, so use this as a guide. Obviously you can get wind at other times than shown here and you also can get skunked! If you have locations you would like to see in the list feel free to let us know.

Windy Kiteboarding Months List:

All Year:
Maui, Tarifa – Spain, Egypt, Hatteras- North Carolina, Cabarete – DR

January
Western Oz, Cape Town-South Africa, La Ventana-Mexico, Boracay-Philipines, Namibia, St. Louis-Senegal, Copal-Costa Rica, Mui Ne Bay-Vietnam, Auckland-NZ, Nashiro-Japan, Baja, Barbados, Kenya-Mombasa, BVIs, Carmelo-Uruguay, Buenos aires-Argentina, Hong Kong, Puclaro-Chile, Yemen-Red Sea

February
Margarita- Western Oz, St. Louis- Senegal, Cape Verde Is, Melbourne, Hua Hin – Thailand, South Africa, La ventana-mexico, Boracay-philipines, Cap Chevalier-Martinique, Zanzibar-Tanzania, Copal-Costa Rica, Mui Ne Bay-Vietnam, Belize, Florida-USA, Nashiro-Japan, Baja, Barbados, South Padre Island-(TX)USA, Esbjerg-Denmark, Cabarete, Bonaire-Carib, St. Lucia-Carib, Whitehaven-Whitsunday Islands, BVIs, Noordwijk ann Zee-Netherlands, Puclaro-Chile, Yemen-Red Sea

March
El gouna-Egypt, cape verde, St. Louis-Senegal, Cabarete, margarita, Western Oz, Hua Hin – Thailand, South Africa, La Ventana-Mexico, Esbjerg-Denmark, Antigua, Goa, Cap Chevalier-Martinique, Zanzibar-Tanzania, Copal-Costa Rica, Mui Ne Bay-Vietnam, Belize, Florida-USA, Barbados, South Padre Island-(TX)USA, Bonaire-Carib, St. Lucia-Carib, Negombo-Sri Lanka, BVIs, Ibiza-Spain, Rosslare-Ireland, Watergate-UK, Cape Hatteras-USA, Puclaro-Chile, Yemen-Red Sea

April
Cape Verde, Maui, Margarita, Western Oz, Hua Hin – Thailand, Antigua, Cap Chevalier-Martinique, Belize, Banff-Canada, Barbados, South Padre Island-(TX)USA, Safaga-Egypt, Bonaire-Carib, St. Lucia-Carib, Whitehaven-Whitsunday Islands, Negombo-Sri Lanka**, Ibiza-spain, Rosslare-Ireland, Watergate-UK, Cape Hatteras-USA, Puclaro-Chile

May
Cape Verde, Margarita, Antigua, Cape Hatteras-USA, Leucate-France, Essaouira-Morocco, Iraq, El yaque-venezuela, ras sudr-egypt, Rhodes-Greece, porto pollo-Sardinia, Fuerteventura, cabarete, Bonaire-Carib, St. Lucia-Carib, Whitehaven-Whitsunday Islands, Ibiza-spain, Aruba-Carib, Tarifa, Puclaro-Chile, Mancora-Peru

June
Fuerteventura, Tenerife, Cape Verde, Cabarete, Raratonga, The Gorge Or-USA, Bol-Croatia, Foddini-Italy, Ponto de Oura-Mozambique, Seychelles*, Maui-USA, fiji, Essaouira-Morocco, Guincho-Portugal, el yaque-venezuela, Rhodes-Greece, Levkada-Greece, dakhla-morocco , Corsica, Rhodes-Greece, Pirlanta-Turkey, Paramali-Cyprus, porto pollo-Sardinia, Lanzarote, Bonaire-Carib, St. Lucia-Carib, Sri Lanka**, Aruba-Carib, Puclaro-Chile, Mancora-Peru

July
Cabarete, Fuerteventura, Tenerife, Mauritius, Naxos-Greece, Raratonga, Leucate-France, The Gorge Or-USA, Pirlanta-Turkey, Bol-Croatia, Foddini-Italy, Seychelles*, solomon Islands, Maui-USA, fiji, Tahiti, Essaouira-Morocco, Guincho-Portugal, el yaque-venezuela, Rhodes-greece, levkada-greece, dakhla – morocco, Corsica, paros-Greece, porto pollo-Sardinia, Lanzarote, El Gouna-Egypt, Safaga-Egypt, Sinai, eilat-Israel, Paramali-Cyprus, Sri Lanka**, Maui-USA, Aruba-Carib, Puclaro-Chile, Mancora-Peru

August
Cabarete, El Gouna-Egypt, Fuerteventura, Tenerife, Brazil, Mauritius, cape verde, Naxos-Greece, Raratonga, The gorge-USA, Bol-Croatia, Pirlanta-Turkey, Foddini-Italy, Zanzibar-Tanzania, Guincho-Portugal, Seychelles*, solomon Islands, Rangiroa-F.polynesia, Maui-USA, Fiji, Tahiti, Essaouira-Morocco, Corsica, Rhodes-Greece, Paramali-Cyprus paros-Greece, Lanzarote, Safaga-Egypt, Eilat-Israel, Sinai, Sri Lanka**, Maui-USA, Aruba-Carib, Puclaro-Chile, Mancora-Peru

September
El Gouna-Egypt, Tucus-Brazil, Mauritius, Pirlanta-Turkey, Zanzibar-Tanzania, Seychelles*, solomon Islands, Rangiroa-F.polynesia, Sumbawa-indonesia, Maui-USA, Madagascar, UK, Corsica, rosslare-Ireland, Canada, Germany, Israel, Sinai-Egypt, Noordwijk ann Zee-Netherlands, Puclaro-Chile, Mancora-Peru, Cumbuco Brazil

October
Tucus-Brazil, Western Oz, Sumbawa-indonesia, Madagascar, New Caledonia, Chile, Watergate-UK, Esbjerg-Denmark, rosslare-Ireland, Buenos Aires-Argentina, Carmelo-Uruguay, Noordwijk ann Zee-Netherlands, Cape Hatteras-USA, Tarifa, Puclaro-Chile, Mancora-Peru, Cumbuco Brazil

November
Melbourne, Tucus-Brazil, Western Oz, Namibia, cape town-South Africa, Sumbawa-indonesia, Auckland-NZ, Madagascar, New Caledonia, Buenos aires-Argentina, Carmelo-Uruguay, Hong Kong, Leucate-France, Noordwijk ann Zee-Netherlands, Tarifa, Puclaro-Chile, Cumbuco Brazil

December
Melbourne, Tucus-Brazil, Western Oz, cape town-South Africa La ventana-mexico, Namibia, Copal-Costa Rica, Mui Ne Bay-Vietnam, Auckland-NZ, Nashiro-Japan, Baja, New Caledonia, Boracay-philipines, Buenos aires-Argentina, Carmelo-Uruguay, Monastir-Tunisia, Hong Kong, Leucate-France, Cape Hatteras-USA, Tarifa, Puclaro-Chile, Yemen-Red Sea

* – means varies depending on the island or side.
** – monsoon season this is the dry side of the island