Power Surf – not strictly surfing but good news to spread


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Tidal power, which could make a considerably energy contribution, has long been the goal of scientists the world over. But while many have dreamed, few have delivered in harnessing the ocean’s strength. As a result tidal energy has lagged far behind solar and wind powers with typical barriers cited as cost, hostile saltwater environment and damage to existing marine life.

That could all be set to change thanks to a British start up, Kepler Energy, who have developed a brand new form of water generator harking back to a traditional water mill. It is predicted the cost of operating, building and delivering energy could be cheaper than that of wind farms and other renewable energy at present.

Costs will be cheaper than lagoons and in time we will be cheaper than offshore wind generation

“Costs will be cheaper than lagoons and in time we will be cheaper than offshore wind generation. Furthermore, investment risk is manageable since turbines are added incrementally to form the fence, with each one generating revenue as it is added.” said Peter Dixon, Chairman of Kepler Energy.

The Kepler patented ‘Transverse Horizontal Axis Water Turbine (THAWT)’ is able to operate in lower velocity and shallower waters than traditional axial turbines and the company are planning the process to ensure that it bears no significant risk to marine life and other users of the sea.

Each turbine is modular and can start producing electricity as soon as it is in position. As more sections are added the power return increases exponentially with a 10km run being likened to a small nuclear reactor.

Kepler are planning a trial 30MW tidal energy fence that will be located in the Bristol Channel, most likely to be located in the Aberthaw to Minehead stretch of water. They are hoping this will be operational by 2020/21.

To find out more visit www.keplerenergy.co.uk

Theatre Thursday: Sri Lanka Suptastic


The Blueline / Paddle Surf Hawaii team explores Sri Lanka.

Featuring Jim Brewer, Genelle Ives and Matt Becker.

Presented by Blueline, Paddle Surf Hawaii, Harvest and Quickblade.

Filmed and edited by Peter Trow

T -1 Tiree Kitesurf and SUP trip is on


The weather looks amazing. Well for kitesurfing and SUP (stand up Paddleboarding)

WIND FORECAST
WIND FORECAST
SWELL FORECAST
SWELL FORECAST

the island – i love it

Screenshot 2014-09-23 14.52.08 Screenshot 2014-09-23 14.53.00

Surf Photography at its best


Way back in 1960, Surfer Magazine founder John Severson ran a photo of a lone surfer paddling out, with these hopeful words: “”In this crowded world, the surfer can still seek and find the perfect day, the perfect wave, and be alone with the surf and his thoughts.” This world has increased in size from just over 3 billion people in 1960, to more than 7 billion. The world’s oceans and beaches are feeling the effects of that population, but it’s still possible to accomplish the solitude that Severson wrote about a half a century ago.

lucia in her element
lucia in her element
between times
between times
a great duck dive - winner of awards
a great duck dive – winner of awards
Doing whatever it takes to get over the top
Doing whatever it takes to get over the top

Here are images from the very talented multi-award winning photographer Lucia Griggi whose office is the ocean and who is one of the most respected surf photographers in a male dominated industry. www.luciagriggi.com

The beast cometh


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From: magic seaweed
The North Atlantic is blowing a hoolie again. Surfers will be hard pressed to remember a winter which has delivered storm force ferocity with such consistency. And as the mercury plunging pattern continues, the forecast is set to hit new highs on Monday, delivering a swell which is somewhat of a step into the unknown.

Unlike a lot of more recent storms with multiple cores, this is one solid system in a position to deliver huge surf to the whole of west facing Europe and North Africa, and most importantly people are preparing to surf it at peak intensity from Scotland and Ireland down through Europe to North Africa. Big wave surfers from across The Pond have been Instagramming flight tickets with Lisbon emblazoned in black ink, for this is a storm which has the potential to be right there in the final percentile. What does 29ft @ 21 seconds look like at Nazare?

“During the past few weeks the bigger swells have traversed inclement routes, normally accompanied with unfavourable wind, giving only a few short windows for the chargers.” Says MSW Forecaster, Francisco. “However this storm which will hit Europe next Monday/Tuesday will exhibit different behaviour, moving from the East Coast of the USA on a north east route. We are forecasting an intensification during Saturday with the wind peaking during the afternoon. Our data currently shows that we will see an area approximately with the size of France with winds exceeding 50 kts and expect maximum wind speeds of 70 kts.”

The Big Numbers

Significant wave heights of more than 65ft/20metres.

Max sustained wind speed close to 70 knots / 80mph.

An area of wave heights exceeding 50ft approximately the size of Iberia.

Mullaghmore Head will be turning inside out at 19ft @ 20 seconds

Sennen in the UK is forecast to be 28ft @ 21 seconds

Belharra in France promises 16ft @ 19 seconds

Nazare is looking at 29ft @ 21 seconds

Anchor Point further south promises at 16ft @ 19 seconds.

To see any forecast with a figure greater than 20in either column generally means powerful surf. To see 20+ in both columns is highly unusual and if the wind stays from the south and doesn’t blow too hard then there will be plenty of spots within Europe which could theoretically turn on.

As ever forecasts are subject to change and we advise keeping tabs on this system as it develops over the weekend. And please if you are not sure of yourself, your chosen spot, or are new to surfing, or the water, stay on dry land.

5 reasons to support local shapers


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San Diego’s Mark Slingerland, making quality boards the old fashioned way. Photo: Ellis

We all know that the era of mass-produced handmade surfboards has come and gone. The biggest board manufacturers in the world rely on design programs and CNC machines more than skilled hands and power planers. But hand shaping hasn’t vanished from the earth—it just changed its address. Instead of residing in big factories, it’s moved into backyards, garages, and tool sheds. And while today’s hand shapers may not be able to churn out the same volume of boards as the biggest brands in the industry, they have more than a few redeeming qualities. Here are five reasons to order your next board from your local backyard shaper.

Local Wave Knowledge
Surf spots are like snowflakes—each one is unique. Your local shaper knows the idiosyncrasies of your local waves because he surfs them too. Take advantage of this. If you share a home break with your shaper, they will probably know exactly what you need from your next surfboard, even if you don’t. “I always add an extra inch and a half of nose rocker to my boards for people surfing locally, because here on Hatteras Island, you need that,” says East Coast shaper Scooter Halladay of Bone Surfboards.

Customization
If you’re lucky, your local surf shop might have 50 different boards on the rack to choose from at any given time. But why settle for a board that was made with neither your surf style nor local waves in mind when your local shaper can offer unlimited wave riding options, all tailored to your surfing and your waves? “There’s always a better or different way to approach a design,” says San Diego shaper Mike Slingerland. “The options in surfboard design are infinite, so the progression will always continue.” Armed with little more than a six-pack and a sketchpad, you can show up at your local shaper’s workspace and draw planlines until your heart’s content. Hopefully your shaper will save you from your most ill conceived ideas and meet you in the middle with something both unique and functional.

Collaboration
Perhaps the only thing better than getting a custom hand shape is getting your own hands dirty in the process. “Handshapes do offer more of an experience for the money,” says East Coast shaper Gary Wilson. “Rapping with the shaper, discussing shapes they like and dislike, or even hitting a session with them are experiences that are unique to ordering from local shapers. I’ll even let the customer help shape his own board if he wants to, as long as he agrees not to sue me when he cuts his finger off.” Even if you do end up losing a pinky in the shaping bay, it might be well worth it if you end up getting barreled on a board that you helped create yourself.

Local Economy Stimulation
On the East Coast, for example, many beach towns overflow with deep-pocketed tourists in the summer months, allowing a lot of local businesses to make the majority of their annual income over a short, seasonal stretch. But as summer turns to fall and fall into winter, the river of tourist dollars dries up, and many towns go comatose. But there are still waves to be had, and if you need a new board for hurricane season, why not get something shaped locally and keep your hard-earned money circulating through your community? You’ll be surfing a quality boards designed for chasing hurricane barrels, and your shaper won’t need to take a second job in the offseason. Everyone wins.

Tradition
The world of surfboard production has changed drastically in the last 20 years. The production handshaper has become a thing of the past, and the number of knowledgeable craftsmen will decrease as it becomes a less viable career path. “Be prepared to sweat and struggle if you want handshape surfboards for a living,” says Steven Divita of Head High custom surfboards. “People want cheap boards, and that’s what the market will provide through new means of production. A lot of people don’t realize the amount of time it takes to build a custom board by hand, but in the end, you get what you pay for.” On top of getting a higher quality board from a local shaper, your business will allow them to continue crafting boards by hand, keeping surfing’s proudest tradition alive and well.