Apple watch and swimming


No not manually ….

If you have an Apple Watch 2 /3 or and you use Strava you’ll be as frustrated as I am that Strava doesn’t support swimming on the watch. You have to record any swim that you do using the watch’s native Workout app (which works really well), then manually create a new activity in Strava and fill in the details. There is quite a thread developing on the Strava Support forum requesting swim support for Apple Watch 2 / 3 and I would urge you to add your name to it. However, I have just discovered the Swim Exporter app that connects with Apple Health and Workout data and imports the information into Strava when you record either a pool swim or an openwater swim using the Workout app. It costs £1.99 and is incredibly simple to use: simply connect it to your Health app and link it to Strava and it will automatically display all swim workouts. To upload a workout to Strava, just click on the workout and click, “Send to Strava”. Job done.

Website: http://stickybit.co.nz/swimexporter/

Apple Store: https://itunes.apple.com/app/swim-exporter/id1227272243

Shame Strava don’t do a swim part for their watch app

Advertisements

Strava sinks (and stinks) for swimmers


Screenshot 2016-04-25 10.49.41.png

There is a severe lack of Swim detail in Strava imported swim activities. Essential metrics for loyal Strava customers such as lap splits, heart rate, PRs, CRs, etc, etc are all missing. The current swim visuals are very poor indeed. I’m more of a cyclist and runner, but if I feel this aspect of Strava lets me down, I can only sympathise with true swimmers and triathletes.

Swapping to Premier paid membership didn’t make any difference in this aspect. Thus, one of the reasons I cancelled my Premier status as have many others. Strava is a great app, but outside cycling and perhaps running, it doesn’t cater for much else.

Many have invested in expensive fitness devices that allow measurement of these metrics. Without the ability of Strava to take advantage of these, customers will consider using the device bespoke applications instead.

Customers have been asking for this for years and Strava just doesn’t seem to care.

Even endomondo also a running cycling site is much better mapping PR’s etc

Screenshot 2016-04-25 10.53.20.png

Garmin itself does much more (it even shows the gap where I paused instead of pressed lap) but it has never really taken off as a social platform ….. will update this if i see something better.

Screenshot 2016-04-25 11.00.11.png

Garmin 920XT and running Dynamics


Got new life insurance and the company i am with offers 50% off on garmin products and as I am such a gadget head i decided to buy the 920XT which is also useful for swimming besides my normal running and cycling.

Screenshot 2016-04-17 15.52.59

The watch itself maps other data that i was not familiar with so popped out this morning on a run just over 10km to explore what the running dynamics mean.

Screenshot 2016-04-17 15.39.25

Running dynamics give a summary

Screenshot 2016-04-17 15.46.35

Cadence i know is stride rate – quicker chi type running has always been my thing – i am not a long heavy impact strider … In general, more experienced runners tend to have higher cadence. An often-cited target for running cadence is 180 steps/min. So i am bang on target for this run.

 

First off is Vertical Oscillation

I was feeling stiff at first but loosened up after a km of running – this is where the data goes into blue – there are green spikes in sync with the downhill sections after that …

The colors show how your ground contact time compares to other runners. The color zones are based on percentiles.

Color Zone Percentile in Zone Ground Contact Time Range
Purple > 95 < 218 ms
Blue 70 – 95 218-248 ms
Green 30 – 69 249 – 277 ms
Orange 5 – 29 278 – 308 ms
Red < 5 > 308 ms

Garmin has researched many runners of all different levels. In general, more experienced runners tend to have shorter ground contact times. Elite runners often have ground contact times of less than 200 ms. Virtually all experienced runners studied have ground contact times of less than 300 ms. Higher cadence and faster paces are both associated with shorter ground contact times. Many running coaches believe that a short ground contact time is characteristic of a more economical running form. However, at a set cadence, decrease of ground contact time usually increases vertical oscillation.