Forget 29ers, how about a 36er!


richdirector:

36inch wheels – mucho grande -

Originally posted on Retro Steel Mountain Bike Rider:

There’s more choice than ever these days when it comes to mountain bike wheel size. The 26er, 29er, or the inbetweener 650b wheels all have their advocates, and a long list of pros and cons exists for each of them.

One of the main recognized benefits of using a larger wheel is the ability to roll over bumps or obstacles more easily, together with some increased traction which may help to offset the extra weight that a larger set of wheels and larger frame would otherwise burden you with.

But why stop at 29 inch wheels. Isn’t it time we asked ourselves (and the bike manufacturers) whether even larger wheels are even faster, and even more fun?

Luckily for a steel enthusiast like me, there are already a bunch of framebuilders who are playing around with 36 inch wheeled mountain bikes!. Yes, that’s right: thirty-six-inch wheels!!

Here are two rather…

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Good old fashioned cold and hungry


richdirector:

I know this feeling well.

Originally posted on ragtime cyclist:

February and March is a tricky time as a cyclist. One minute you’ve detected the mere hint of spring in the air, and the next it’s back to the joys of full-on winter riding.

“Where’s my crisp, sunny, winter morning gone?” I thought recently as I pedalled through the deepening gloom. The late winter sunshine promised by the forecasters was all but gone, replaced by sleet, hail, snow, and every other kind of cold rain. It was looking like a cold few hours on the bike.

I can be strangely optimistic when it comes to the weather. If the forecast is grim I refuse to believe it and expect better, if the forecast is good I take it as gospel and prepare for nothing less; hence the slight chill running through me on this Sunday morning in February, wearing a layer too few and getting wet. photo(3)

An hour in…

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Stannard dishes out a masterclass


from peleton magazine…..

The defending race champion somehow managed to beat three super-strong riders from the same team — Etixx-Quick-Step’s Tom Boonen, Niki Terpstra, and Stijn Vandenbergh — and take the classics season opener in Ghent, Belgium.

It was a huge disaster for Etixx-Quick-Step and an unforgettable performance by Stannard.

First, here are the top 10 results (via Sporza):

#OHN

Here’s how things played out in the finale:

In the closing kilometers of the race, after the group of four had been out in front for 40 kilometers, the three Etixx riders started attacking repeatedly in hopes of forcing Stannard to chase and tire himself out.

Almost everyone seemed to be saying that Etixx had the win in the bag and that it would be too difficult for Stannard to win. It looked possible for Etixx to dominate the whole podium in a clean sweep.

And with the likes of Boonen and Terpstra attacking, all that made perfect sense. It was a really classic set-up in terms of tactics: three riders versus one. So, attack the lone guy until he’s blown and win the race.

Boonen put in the first big attack. Stannard was isolated but kept on the gas, with Terpstra and Vandenbergh sitting on his wheel. Then Boonen imploded, and Stannard closed the gap to him.

Next to attack was Terpstra, and Vandenbergh jumped on his wheel, which was puzzling (why not let Stannard chase Terpstra, then attack Stannard again with another hit?). They gapped Stannard right away. But Stannard clawed his way back to them. Suddenly, it was all four back together.

That’s when Stannard jumped. It was quite a sight. He got a gap right away, surprising the Etixx riders, who seemed to be tiring themselves out.

Terpstra rode up to Stannard, while a totally blown Boonen tried to get back to them (Vandenbergh had imploded and was gone). It came down to Terpstra and Stannard going to the line mano a mano, with Terpstra leading out the sprint and Stannard just coming around him to cross the line first.

Watch the final 10 or so kilometers of the race below. (Skip to 6:00 for the real fireworks.)

We already knew Stannard was super strong and a real hardman. Saturday he showed he’s not only one of the toughest riders in the peloton but also one of its most astute tacticians. The guy doesn’t know how to give up. His combination of brute strength and clever riding won him the race.

What looked like a predictable outcome after classic tactics of three-on-one backfired. Conventional wisdom failed because Stannard was too strong. He’s only 27, so expect to see him winning more races.

“I couldn’t be happier,” Stannard told TeamSky.com after the race. “It’s nice to do the double sweep at the race, but after the difficulties I had last year breaking my back it’s nice to have got myself back to where I was.

“Being with those three guys I knew they were all committed to trying to win. As a team they haven’t won it for 10 years and it’s a big one missing off Boonen’s palmares. I knew they were going to race hard. With Sep Vanmarcke and Greg van Avermaet chasing behind it put the pressure on them. I could just sit back, play a bit of poker and enjoy the ride.

“I just wanted to get a free ride for as long as I could. That was my idea. When they all started attacking me it wasn’t a great feeling. When Boonen went I was thinking ‘right, what do I do here?’ I knew if I rode him back I’d get attacked. I paced myself back a little bit. I could feel the wheel behind was trying hard to stay with me. So I felt like it was going pretty good and then I just took my chance.”

Here’s what Terpstra and Boonen had to say (via Etixx-Quick-Step.com):

Terpstra: “Looking back, maybe it would have been better to wait for the sprint with Tom and not attacking, but it’s a question of moment and circumstances. Stannard was really strong in the end against our attacks, and deserved the win.”

Boonen: “Today we made a mistake in the final,” Boonen said. He added: “There is a thin line between a great race and a costly mistake and unfortunately we took the risk of not waiting for the sprint, and it didn’t work out. It would have been great to win the race, but that’s cycling. Congrats to Stannard. He rode a smart tactical race and his reactions to our attacks were impressive. His sprint was also strong. As a team we rode super strong today and while we unfortunately fell short of victory, we know what we are capable of for future races.”

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It’s a zoo out there


richdirector:

Haha
these are always good

Originally posted on Sketchbook of a Strava Artist:

Strava Giraffe This work of Strava art by Stephen Lund required around 115 kilometres of cycling in and around Victoria, BC garmin gps strava art cycling bicycling cyclist This work of Strava art by Stephen Lund required around 115 kilometres of cycling in and around Victoria, BC

Remember that scene near the end of Twelve Monkeys – where Bruce Willis’ character learns that the Army of the 12 Monkeys has set all the animals free from the zoo and then sees four giraffes cantering along a Philadelphia freeway?

Well, that’s what it’s like on the streets of Victoria, BC today, as I spent my morning surprising the city with about 100 kilometres worth of Strava giraffe.

In a straight line from head to front hoof, she measures about 11 kilometres.

I had to use the “Strava OFF/Strava ON” trick for a few sections of the legs as the inventory of roads (especially straight ones) is rather meagre in that area. With the extra dashing about between OFF and ON points, this work of Strava art called for around 115 km of cycling.

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I feel inadequate in my ‘fatness’


This is a quick edit from my first few rides on the Fatback Corvus Fatbike. I spent a couple weeks in Southern California to ride mototrials and was lucky enough to get the Fatback together before I got out there. It was a blast on all the terrain I could find in SoCal, from the beach to the dunes, high desert to low. This bike can handle everything. Dont worry, the skids were on motorcycle trails! Stay tuned for my next edit riding

Quite amazing riding isn’t it?