Vroom Vroom


Jan 30, 2016 – A concealed motor was found on a bike being used by Belgian cyclist Femke Van den Driessche at the world cyclo-cross championships, the head of the International Cycling Union (UCI) said on Sunday, confirming the first such case at a top-level competition.
“It’s absolutely clear that there was technological fraud. There was a concealed motor. I don’t think there are any secrets about that,” UCI president Brian Cookson told a news conference.

The bike was seized on Saturday after Van den Driessche, one of the race favourites, was forced to withdraw from the women’s under-23 race because of a mechanical problem.

Van den Driessche, 19, denied that she had on purpose used a bike with a concealed motor, saying that it was identical to her own but belonged to a friend and that a team mechanic had given it to her by mistake before the race.

“It wasn’t my bike, it was that of a friend and was identical to mine,” a tearful Van den Driessche told Belgian TV channel Sporza.

“This friend went around the course Saturday before dropping off the bike in the truck. A mechanic, thinking it was my bike, cleaned it and prepared it for my race,” she added, insisting that she was “totally unaware” it was fitted with a hidden motor.

“I feel really terrible. I’m aware I have a big problem. (But) I have no fears of an inquiry into this. I have done nothing wrong,” she said.

If found guilty of cheating the rider faces disqualification, a six-month suspension and a fine of up to 200,000 Swiss francs (180,000 euros, $195,000). “We’ve heard some stories for a long time now about the possibility of this.

We have been alive to a potential way that people might cheat and we have been testing a number of bikes and a number of events for several months,” Cookson said.

“I am committed and the UCI is committed to protecting the riders who do not want to cheat in whatever form and to make sure that the right riders win the race. “We have been looking at different methods of testing this kind of technology and we tested a number of bikes yesterday and one was found.

“We will keep testing both at this event and subsequent events. Whether this means that there is widespread use of this form of cheating remains to be seen.”

Cookson said that the matter would next go before the UCI’s disciplinary commission.

Etixx team manager Patrick Lefevere called for a “lifetime suspension for the cheat”, while Belgian national team coach Rudy De Bie was outraged by the discovery.

“I never thought that such schemes were possible. It’s a scandal that Femke’s entourage have deceived the Belgian federation,” he said.

The news is a fresh blow to a sport still recovering from the Lance Armstrong doping scandal after the disgraced American cyclist admitted to cheating throughout his career in 2013 following years of denials and ruthless attacks on his accusers.

However, it isn’t the first time eyebrows have been raised over suspicions of “mechanical doping” – the term used for bikes found to have a hidden motor inside the wheels or frame that serves as an illegal aid to the rider.

Last year’s Tour de France champion Chris Froome faced accusations of using a motorised bicycle, while Fabian Cancellara’s 2010 victory in the Tour of Flanders also stirred a debate.

He denied the accusations before, a week later, racing off into the distance to win Paris-Roubaix even more impressively.

Cyclo-cross races are held on technical and hilly 2.5 to 3.5-kilometer circuits and approximately last one hour.

Riders complete several laps of the course and can sometimes be forced to dismount to climb steep slopes and bypass obstacles. The event is most popular in traditional road cycling countries such as Belgium, France and the Netherlands

Advertisements

“Selecting the Right Tires For Wide-Rim Wheels”


For those riding road bikes rolling on clincher rims with a width of 24 mm or more, this piece by Paul Lew may be of some urgent interest when selecting tyres. Or, consider switching to tubulars.

https://chikashimiyamoto.wordpress.com/2016/01/22/selecting-the-right-tires-for-wide-rim-wheels/

Friday Bike Poster: Ride the Divide


ride-the-divide-movie-poster.jpg

Is a solo, self-supported ultra-cycling challenge to race all 2,745 miles of Adventure Cycling Association’s epic Great Divide Mountain Bike Route. There are no compulsory rest periods or specified distances racers must travel daily. The race clock runs non-stop. He or she who can ride the fastest while making fewer, shorter stops usually wins. With an average time-to-completion of three weeks in the saddle, this grand tour is the longest, most challenging mountain bike race on the planet. It’s a contest for the ultra-fit but only if ultra-prepared for myriad contingencies of backcountry biking.

Tour Divide was born of inspiration from John Stamstad’s watershed `99 Divide ITT, and the US border to border challenge known as the Great Divide Race (ca.`04). TD observes all the historical Divide racing controls save length. It pushes the envelope further by staging opening day racing from the top of the GDMBR in Banff, AB, where MTB-legal wilderness of Banff National Park serves as an immediate test of mettle. The Canadian section adds only 10% more trail, yet rewards riders with unforgettable geology, rugged terrain, abundant wildlife, and an international flair cycling has come to expect from grand tour racing.

Whether voyager or voyeur, Tour Divide is a dramatic tribute to both human capacity to endure and Adventure Cycling’s excellence in crafting North America’s crown jewel of off-pavement touring routes.

The Sixth Annual Mirabaud Yacht Racing Image Award


#3 is just silly and a photoshop photo certainly does not belong in the top 5. Excluding the helmsman and the guy on his back, the other two were photoshopped in. I like #5 the most and #1 as 2nd

———

The sixth annual Mirabaud Yacht Racing Image awards were given out last December. Here is a look at the top five photos from the competition as chosen by the public.

Number5

Photographer: Jesus Renedo

Number 5

 

 

Number4

Photographer: Martina Orsini

Number 4

 

Number3

Photographer: Stefan Coppers

Number 3

 

Number2

Photographer: Brian Carlin

Number 2

 

Winner: Rick Tomlinson

Number1

Photographer Rick Tomlinson took home the Public Award for this shot of Team Brunel sailing past Cape Horn during the 2014-15 Volvo Ocean Race.

New Year Weight


This year like last year has seen my weight hit the post xmas not good limit …. early 2015 was a 2 week drinking cocktail with breakfast holiday in Cuba and this year has been Xmas at home with kids – how much beer and food can I enjoy

So 3kg up on what I want …. 73kg in 175cm so BMI still says healthy – but the mind says no … BMI calculator

Screenshot 2016-01-18 16.30.16

 

Then read this in the Radavist and my mind is opening up to possibilities …. WATCH THIS SPACE

Rouge_Roubaix-FOOD-1

Over the past few years – since moving to Austin in 2010 – I’ve been struggling with weight loss. Look, we’re all cyclists. We probably all ride with skinny, fit dudes and as a bigger guy, it’s frustrating. Even now, at the peak of my fitness, I still get dropped by “climbers”. What I found was to take these experiences and use them as part of my motivation. There was one defining moment however. A majority of it came from a ride I did in Australia a few years back…


prollyride_116

Granted, this ride was really tough. Two, 100-120 mile days with over 15,000′ elevation a day in the Australian summer. I didn’t bonk, but it took me forever to climb, then I laid down and rested for 3-5 minutes. No big deal. It did however lend itself as an opportunity for Andy to make some sort of comment along the lines of “you’ve got big lungs and long legs, if you got in shape, you’d be a strong rider.”

From there, something burned inside me and I’m not talking about a hot pizza slice. I wanted to be able to enjoy tough rides and be fit enough to carry camera gear with me, or sprint up ahead to set up a photo. I wanted to up my game.

I began thinking about what I was eating. Instead of getting BBQ after a ride, I ate lean protein and salads. Instead of drinking beer, I switched solely to bourbon and instead of riding at a comfortable pace solo, I began pushing myself.

It took over two years before people began to see a noticeable difference in my fitness.

TEXAS_CX-9

Here I am in 2012, racing cross. I probably weighed around 215 here, down from 225.

RaphaLightweight-4

2013, around 210.

BSS_six-shooter_weekend-141

2013, opening weekend of cross season, right at 190lbs.

Falls_Kauai-1

Now, in 2014 I fluctuate between 175 and 185, depending on what I’m riding, how often and hydration levels. “Race weight” is 175, sitting on my ass driving a pickup truck down the PCH and traveling to see family for a month weight is 185.

That’s over four years of steady, slow weight loss. Any doctor I’ve talked to has told me that is the key. Weight loss should come from a lifestyle change, from diet, to physical exercise and it should happen over time. If you rush it, you’ll do your body more harm than good.

That said, here are the main changes I made with my lifestyle. Granted, you shouldn’t try to go all in here. Just make small changes. Cutting yourself off from your favorite foods sucks. Instead, treat them as a reward. Really love burgers? Reward yourself after a tough ride with a burger. Just don’t keep eating burgers every single day!

Rouge_Roubaix-FOOD-6

Here we go. Healthy helps. These are my normal meals:

Breakfast: a 1/2 – 1 cup of oatmeal with blueberries, toasted almonds, cinnamon and water. Simple. Or quinoa with a fried egg. Yolk and all.

Lunch: I have two lunches, the post-ride lunch and busy day lunch.
-Post-ride: fish tacos (grilled) or a salad with fish on top.
-Busy day, no ride: Fresh soup and tortilla chips. Even canned soup is good, just watch the sodium.

Dinner: I love the shit out of greens. Bok Choy, kale, chard spinach. Sauteed, steamed, whatever. I eat a good portion of greens every day. That’s a given. Fresh fish from the market, cooked on a skillet. Sweet potatoes, squash, brown rice, quinoa. Whatever. If you like Whole Foods, look into the “Health Starts Here” food items. Hell, try to go vegetarian.

moab-three
Photo by Margus Riga

Ride a lot, often. The shorter, sweeter rides are better than always doing 60+ rides. I’ll go out on the road bike in the morning for 20 miles and then the mountain bike at night sometimes for the same. Mix your riding up. Mountain bikes rule because they wipe out your entire body. Give yourself time to recover. If your legs are sore, do a recovery spin. Don’t go out hammering away.

Don’t overdo it. You can literally ride yourself into trouble.

That said, big rides help in weight loss for sure. I still do one or two big rides a month. Eat on the bike, but avoid mass-produced bars. Instead, go for foods like avocado, almonds, mangos, almond butter, etc. Sweets are ok on the bike, so relish them! Just remember, if you eat foods high in cholesterol, you’re not helping your body.

VanWinkle10_Rapha-6

Drinking.

Fuck beer. Seriously. It’s the worst. If you’re trying to lose weight, stop drinking beer! It’s tough, but that stuff is like drinking dead calories. You might as well be eating pizza every night.

Bourbon has the least amount of calories than any other liquor. It has no additives, no flavoring, it’s a mash in a charred oak barrel and that’s where it gets its flavoring. Vodka is also good. Drink it on the rocks, or neat. Mixing with ginger ale or ginger beer is horrible for you. Look at how much sugar is in ginger ale!

If you’re going to drink beer, drink shitty, “light” beer.

Skratch-8

Snacking. Buy almonds, salted is fine. They’re great for you. Just don’t eat an entire bag. I usually snack on a handful if I’m hungry. Or eat a banana. If I am craving something sweet, I literally drink a thing of Skratch.

plantfusion

Finally, recovery! I used to do nothing for recovery, aside from trying to eat in 30 minutes of finishing a ride. Now, when I finish a ride, I take a plant-based protein mix. Doing so has really helped me build lean, healthy muscle.

Normal protein has so much added shit in it, makes you feel bloated, swells your muscles and it always made me gassy. This stuff is amazing. Vanilla is my favorite.

Self
Photo by Kyle Kelley

I know that didn’t read much as a guide book to losing weight, it’s more of an explanation as to how I lost weight. Look, it’s not easy, don’t be fooled. There’s a lot of times that I want to gorge on pizza, or eat nonstop. You will be hungry, a lot. It’s tough, but you’ve really just got to ‘shrink your stomach’ and your appetite.

Like training on the bike, you’ve got to train yourself to eat well, in order to be well. Yes, I still eat breakfast tacos, or pizza, or burgers, but a lot less than I did. Remember, it’s about a happy medium.