Robot Bike Co


Seen at Fort William World Cup – this innovative company  doing ti and Carbon bikes. 3D printed ti lugs ……

Only one model at the moment but sure to grow

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R160

The R160 is Robot Bike Co’s first frame, and whilst it may be our only one at present, this could well be the only bike you need. With aggressive geometry and 160mm of travel the R160 thrives in steep and technical terrain, yet at the same time it is equally at home on climbs and all day epics. The unique DW6 suspension system plays a key part in this versatility. The progressive leverage ratio provides the suppleness you need for grip at the start of the travel, support in the middle, and a bottomless feeling at the end for when you’re really pushing things, perfect no matter what situation you find yourself in. Of course alongside grip and composure you also want a frame that pedals well, and once again the DW6 design won’t leave you wanting, the R160 is as efficient as they come.

We believe that 27.5” wheels are the perfect partner for a bike of this nature as they offer great speed whilst crucially still being able to handle the sort of thrashing that they are likely to encounter on the R160. You’ll also find a 12x142mm rear axle for maximum compatibility purposes, and a proper threaded bottom bracket (no creaking here!). Talking of threads, apart from the bottom bracket ones you won’t find a single thread anywhere else on the titanium parts of the frame. We’ve seen too many frames written off by damaged threads, so all of ours are easily replaceable should that ever be required.

You can learn more about the technical details of the unique engineering that has gone into the R160 if you head to our tech section (needs link), but all that effort would be worthless if the frame didn’t fit you perfectly, and that’s why we believe a custom fit is so important. Once we have your measurements we will provide you with our recommend geometry. That recommendation will be based upon what we believe provides the ultimate blend of speed, fun, stability and agility. If you have different priorities/requirements then for a small extra charge we are more than happy to discuss these with you and work out what is best for you in order to create something truly bespoke, but we believe that the vast majority of riders will love our suggested geometry as much as we do.

Did some filming of them which will feature in a future Adventure show on BBC scotland

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Reblog – Picking holes in the new cycling landscape


Last week I read an article in the Guardian which generated both empathy and disappointment at the same time (though far more of the latter, than the former). The article – written by Tom Marriage – laments an apparent loss: …peculiar achievement, of anoraks and curly cheese sandwiches eaten on forgotten B-road laybys. It was a […]

https://cyclestuff.wordpress.com/2016/04/18/picking-holes-in-the-new-cycling-landscape/

Theatre Thursday: Yeti does the South West (USA)


The landscape of the American southwest is an ethereal place. The cathedral towers, deep canyons, and crushed red dirt produce terrain with endless riding possibilities. One is only limited by his efforts to push further. Pedaling along the sun drenched plateaus and in the shadowed canyons, all while sleeping below the stars in the cool night, you can start to feel displaced from the daily grind. That is until the beer runs low, the skins begins to redden and you head back to civilization to refuel. The deserts of the southwest are like a second home for many mountain bikers, providing a sanctuary in the winter months as an escape from whatever ails.
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yeticycles.com/excursions/southwest
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10 reasons you should race your mtb


I should also point out: I SUCK at racing.  I’m a busy guy, I don’t have time to really train, I barely have time to ride every now and again.  I’m distracted in my race focus as I ride road and also SUP and kitesurf. I’m not a naturally-gifted athlete, and I’m carrying an extra 5kg I don’t need.  I’m a slightly better than 70%  racer on a good day.

My HipstaPrint 6

 

1. It doesn’t have to cost a lot of money, but there are good reasons it sometimes does.

Sure, some races are expensive: I’ve paid as much as £150 for an event registration fee (plus a night in a hotel, gas, food, etc.), but I’ve also paid as little as £5 at a local race I rode.  It’s also important to keep in mind that the expensive races are expensive for a reason (besides just greed – there aren’t many rich MTB race promoters).  Promoters have to buy insurance, swag items, number plates, course marking materials, permits from land owners, and prizes, among many other things.  Most big races are typically manned by volunteers from various local organizations (bike clubs, boy scout troupes, local trail running clubs, etc.), and the promoters make donations back to the those groups as a thank you for their help.

 

the sweep
Strathpuffer on the non snow and ice side of the hill

 

2. You can spend all day (or night) enjoying yourself on a bike.

Greg is right that at some races you’re pedaling too hard to look around and enjoy the scenery.  My advice: do an endurance race!  If you’re riding 50+ mile, and you’re like 99% of MTBers, you will not be riding super fast.  Sure, you’re pushing yourself, but if you’re going to survive and make it to the end of race you’ve got to be somewhat conservative, and there’s plenty of time to look around and enjoy where you are.  I’ve even stopped for pictures at races.  I’m nowhere near the front of the group, so why not?

3. You get to ride new places and not worry about navigation.

Exploring is great.  But a lot of times, I just want to ride my bike and shred some singletrack.  Races are a GREAT way to explore trails you’ve never been on without the hassle of stopping to check maps again and again.  Just turn the pedals and enjoy.

Glen finglas 4 More Lads - still no Crawf!

4. You can see tons of new things while preparing for an event.

I like endurance races… have I mentioned that?  Preparing for an endurance race means riding–a lot.  A lot more than you otherwise would.  I don’t know about you, but I can only ride circles around the same trail so many times a month before I need to venture out and try something else.  Also, most of the races I do aren’t local–they’re off somewhere else, which is why I want to go.  It’s really rare that I bother pre-riding a race course, certainly not riding it again and again and again. (i agree ED)

 

richbike
No helmet – rigid days but that handlebar and that hair seriously??

 

5. Races give you a guided tour of awesome trails.

Most of the races I’ve been to go out of their way to route the event over some of the best trails in the area.  Avoiding technical areas? Some do maybe, but lots of races use those technical areas as the focal point of the route–it’s why you’re there.  Hundreds of people haven’t flocked to Scotland mid winter to do a 24hr ride for over a decade because of the doubletrack sections –they go for ice over rock garden at the top. If you want to ride your bike all day on fun and/or challenging terrain, there’s plenty of opportunity to do so.

 

6. You don’t have to be as self reliant.

Self reliance is great, and I’m a big proponent of it.  I carry the tools and supplies to fix almost anything on my bike on pretty much every ride.  Even road rides, I’ve got a pump, a minitool, and a few spare tubes.  But it’s also really nice to ditch some of that stuff and ride all day without carrying the extra crap.  When I go to races, I make sure my bike is in tip-top shape, and since there are aid stations every so often, I’m able to carry less, and I can send supplies ahead to the stations to refuel/top off supplies along the way.  Where else can you ride 65 miles and not have to carry a massive hydration pack? I do always carry the essentials, though (spare tube, multitool, power links, and derailleur hanger all fit in a small saddle bag, and a pump in a jersey pocket). Even if the aid stations are only 10 miles apart, I don’t want to have to walk for miles in bike shoes.

7. Grass Roots Good Times.

Greg’s point about over commercialization is valid to an extent, but at the same time it’s silly to complain about pros decked out in matching kits head to toe when A) they’re paid to do so, and B) plenty of weekend warriors spend their own money do exactly the same thing.  Most MTB races I’ve been to, including the big ones, are super laid back events where everyone is there to have a good time.  Sure, there might be some sponsor logos on the finish line banner and whatnot, but who cares? Those companies probably donated that stuff.

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8. The time constraints.

Honestly, I don’t have a major counterpoint to this. Races are (sometimes) big events with (sometimes) lots of people–there has to be a schedule, and if you’re participating, you have to adhere to it.  But that doesn’t mean you can’t still explore the town.  I’ve explored towns I would have never been to had it not been for attending a MTB race–ate at great restaurants, explored nearby trails the day before the race, and checked out some cool bike shops.

9. Meet lots of people!

Okay, if you want solitude (and we all do at times), a race is not the place for that.  But at the same time, races present the chance to meet a lot of really cool people.  I’ve shaken hands and chatted with a spanish elite rider sleeping in his belingo van and driven up to do a marathon race in Scotland because the ‘weather is worse’ .  I’ve met people in person I’ve chatted with on forums before.  I’ve seen with my own eyes people do things on bikes I wouldn’t have thought possible. (not just the accidents)

 

selkirk SPLASH crop
Scotland + SUN – seriously?

 

10. You’ll realize you suck, and will then get much better.

A few years ago I raced and when I pulled into the first feed station at mile 15 one of the volunteers announced, “In case anyone is wondering, the leaders are about 30 minutes ahead of you.”  WHAT?!?! I didn’t even know I’d been riding for 30 minutes already–it was hard to believe the leaders could be so far ahead already.  It took me a little over 7 hours to cover the 75ish-mile course with over 2300m of climbing–the winner finished in just over 4.5 hours. And once when I raced the 60km course the winner on the 85km course overtook me 10km from the finish.

Attending a race–especially one with pro riders in attendance–you’re guaranteed to get a HUGE slice of humble pie.  For one thing, I routinely get bested by guys several decades older than me.  I want to be those guys when I grow up–it’s motivating to keep at it, keep pushing, keep trying to improve.  Not only that, but having a big event on the calendar is a great motivator to ride as much as possible.  You will get fitter.  You will become a better bike handler.  Youwill get faster.

You might still suck when compared to the guys who get paid to ride, but you’re better than before, and you’ll always know there’s lots of room for improvement.

ruthin 09

Conclusion

Racing is awesome.  It provides an opportunity to ride somewhere you might not get to otherwise, you get support so you don’t have to carry gallons of water and lots of food all day, and it’s a GREAT way to challenge and push yourself.  You’ll learn things out on the course that will help you in all aspects of life–not just riding.  Endurance racing in particular is a great for mental toughness training.  Plus, convince some friends to race with you and you have a fun weekend away with your buddies.

That said, racing should absolutely not be the only reason you ride–if it is, it will take the fun out of mountain biking.  But racing is a great way to compliment and improve your mountain biking life, and add some variety.

Another titanium maker you haven’t heard of (yet)


Matts-Titanium-Stinner-Hardtail-29r-21-1335x890from radavist

Titanium makes for a great off-road material. The tubing diameters are oftentimes larger than steel resulting in a ride quality that’s unprecedented. For Santa Barbara’s Stinner Frameworks, titanium was the next logical material to learn how to tig weld. Their shop now offers titanium road, touring, road and mountain bikes, with Matt’s being one of the recent beasts to be born.

Keeping the Tunnel 29’r frame raw, it’s offset by the razzle-painted Rock Shox Pike fork, Jones wheels, SRAM 1x drivetrain, internally-routed Reverb dropper and a Thomson cockpit.

Matt grew up riding MTBs in Topanga and Calabasas as a kid but hadn’t touched one in over 14 years. This bike will be the catalyst to get him back on the trails in Santa Barbara and hopefully he’ll be shredding with us when he comes home to Los Angeles over the holidays.

For those of you unfamiliar with Matt’s work, he’s the photographer for Stinner Frameworks and goes by the handle @HazardousTaste on Instagram. I highly suggest you give him a follow!

People ride this for Love and Money


DH at this weekend

Look at the course and these guys are riding the course without anger – crazy.

The mountain bike season concludes this week with the UCI Mountain Bike & Trials World Championships, held in Vallnord-La Massana, Andorra, high among the Pyrenees mountains between Spain and France. Athletes will compete in the disciplines of cross-country Olympic, Eliminator, team relay, downhill and trials for the right to wear the rainbow stripes all through the next season.

The action begins on Tuesday with the Eliminator, a short intense competition, where riders compete four at a time on a 900 metre technically demanding track, with the top-2 of each heat moving on to the next round until only four riders are left to race for the titles for Women and Men.

MTB – Line Choice and obstacles


This video whilst seemingly obvious is one of those little things overlooked when trying to eke out every metre in a race. Not racing well it also avoids you losing your line or scrubbing wide and washing out ….

and this one better